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Dagga doesn’t adversely affect teen IQ (but cigarettes do), concludes new study

15 January 2016 1:23 PM
A new study of 2235 adolescents finds a “robust” link between smoking cigarettes and lower educational performance.

Dagga does not negatively affect school marks or the IQ of teenagers, concludes a new study of 2235 adolescents published in the UK Journal of Psychopharmacology.

The scientists, however, found a “robust” link between smoking cigarettes and lower educational performance.

“These findings suggest that adolescent cannabis use is not associated with IQ or educational performance once adjustment is made for potential confounds, in particular adolescent cigarette use,” the scientists who performed the study said.

The study made headlines this past week, particularly in the US (where a number of states have legalised dagga) and the UK (where support for legalisation is growing).

Click here to read the report and here to learn more about the UK Journal of Psychopharmacology (published on behalf of the British Association for Psychopharmacology).


15 January 2016 1:23 PM