The Friday Stand-In 2016

#FridayStandIn Kumi Naidoo looks at Africa's challenges and opportunities

It's been only six months since consummate advocate and activist, Kumi Naidoo, returned to South Africa, after being away for six years heading up Greenpeace.

In his process of 'relearning and reconnecting with his country', Kumi opened up the debate on South Africa’s nuclear building programme.

Professor Philip Lloyd, Cape Peninsula University of Technology’s Energy Institute argued “for nuclear building”, and Dominique Doyle, Energy Policy Officer at Earthlife Africa argued “against nuclear building.”

And the nuclear debate was also on Twitter.

Kumi talked to Mo Ibrahim, founder of the Mo Ibrahim Foundation, about the challenges facing African civil society.

Ibrahim shared his views on the state of agriculture, land, leadership and youth activism in the continent.

And there was a surprise guest! Kumi chatted to rapper Riky Rick...

Even though, Kumi says he was nervous, he did an amazing job. See some of the behind the scenes highlights on our Facebook gallery below.


Recommended

by NEWSROOM AI
Read More
Top 10 #FridayStandIn hosts and fun moments

Top 10 #FridayStandIn hosts and fun moments

We've been featuring interesting personalities as guest presenters on the Redi Tlhabi show. It's time to recount some key moments

Protesting students did universities a favour, says UCT Law Dean

Protesting students did universities a favour, says UCT Law Dean

There's no 'business as usual' at university campuses thanks to student activism, says the Dean of Law at UCT.

ConCourt Judge is last #FridayStandIn for 2016

ConCourt Judge is last #FridayStandIn for 2016

Activist and former Constitutional Court Judge Albie Sachs hosts the Redi Tlhabi show this Friday.

Vusi Thembekwayo talks to the seeds of Sankara, Biko, Luthuli and Suzman

Vusi Thembekwayo talks to the seeds of Sankara, Biko, Luthuli and Suzman

The "Rockstar" kicked it on the #FridayStandIn show, discussing three topics close to his heart- entrepreneurship, cars and blackness.

Roger Moore has died, age 89

Roger Moore has died, age 89

Listen to Roger Moore opening up to CapeTalk's Melanie Verwoerd about his life, acting and being James Bond.

Sylvester Chauke sets Twitter alight as the #FridayStandin

Sylvester Chauke sets Twitter alight as the #FridayStandin

This week's #FridayStandin, Sylvester Chauke, hit the ground running and was widely welcomed by 702 land

Popular articles
Hits from the bong (it’s legal!)… then off to work I go?

Hits from the bong (it’s legal!)… then off to work I go?

The consequences of consuming dagga at home and showing up at the office high. Bruce Whitfield interviews a labour lawyer.

Tax ombud to probe Sars – yet again - after taxpayers complain

Tax ombud to probe Sars – yet again - after taxpayers complain

The Money Show’s Bruce Whitfield interviews Adv. Eric Mkhawane, CEO at the Office of the Tax Ombud.

Medical aid premiums are set to increase in 2019

Medical aid premiums are set to increase in 2019

The submissions are currently with the Council for Medical Schemes for consideration.

Assisted suicide activist facing murder charge released on bail

Assisted suicide activist facing murder charge released on bail

Eyewitness News reporter Shamiela Fisher gives a summary of the court proceedings for Sean Davison.

'We can barely enforce tobacco legislation, how will we to deal with dagga?'

'We can barely enforce tobacco legislation, how will we to deal with dagga?'

International law enforcement expert and former Drug Unit Commander Lobo das Neves says ruling opens a different can of worms.

Basic Education to introduce Kiswahili and coding to SA's curriculum

Basic Education to introduce Kiswahili and coding to SA's curriculum

Basic Education spokesperson Elijah Mhlanga spoke to Joanne Joseph on the Afternoon Drive to elaborate.

ConCourt rules dagga legal for private use, but what is private?

ConCourt rules dagga legal for private use, but what is private?

Associate Professor of Law at Wits University James Grant says the ConCourt did not define what private use was.