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How South Africa stole the 2010 World Cup

The World Cup was superbly organised. But there were serious questions that got buried in the national fervour.

Ray Hartley

The Money Show’s Bruce Whitfield interviewed Rand Daily Mail Editor Ray Hartley for his weekly business book review.

Hartley spoke about his book “The Big Fix - How SA stole the 2010 world cup”.

Press release for “The Big Fix - How SA stole the 2010 world cup”

Everyone has wonderful memories of the 2010 Fifa World Cup.

In June 2010, the richest World Cup ever kicked off as delirious South African fans gathered in a rare act of national unity to make the world’s biggest sporting event a success. The magnificent new stadiums were packed and the streets were safe. It all went off like clockwork.

But behind this impressive achievement lay billions in wasted public money, crooked companies rigging construction tenders and the fixing of a string of matches involving the national team. Tragically, one of those who blew the whistle would pay with his life.

Then, in May 2015, the arrest of Fifa executives revealed that the tournament’s very foundations were rotten. Evidence emerged that South Africa had encouraged Fifa to pay money to a corrupt member of its executive to secure three votes in favour of its hosting the tournament.

As Sepp Blatter’s Fifa edifice crumbled, a web of transactions, from New York to Trinidad and Tobago and the Cayman Islands, showed how money was diverted to ensure that South Africa’s bid to host the tournament succeeded.

In “The Big Fix”, Ray Hartley reveals the truth about the rotten foundation on which an epic national achievement was built, exposing the people who used the event to amass wealth and power. This is the real story of the 2010 World Cup.

About the author

Ray Hartley is the editor of the Daily Mail, an online newspaper that publishes opinion, analysis and commentary. He is a former editor of the Sunday Times, South Africa’s largest-circulation newspaper, and was the founding editor of the daily The Times. He is the author of “Ragged Glory: The Rainbow Nation Black and White” (Jonathan Ball), a history of South Africa in the democratic era.

Scroll down for quotes from the audio below.

An exhausted Mandela flew back to South Africa without guarantees.

Ray Hartley

Sepp Blatter wanted the stadium in Greenpoint.

Ray Hartley

The Cape Town Stadium has the largest glass roof in the world!

Ray Hartley

The original budget for entire stadium bill for the whole country was R2.3 billion!

Ray Hartley

There was never a question of fixing any of the World Cup games.

Ray Hartley

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