'The idea that Gordhan cannot be touched is very unfortunate' says analyst

Political analyst Dumisani Hlophe says the minister of finance's decision not to present himself to the Hawks undermines democratic institutions.

Minister Pravin Gordhan was summoned by Hawks to answer questions related to the investigation into a unit set up at SARS while he was the organisation’s Commissioner.

Pravin released a statement saying he has taken legal counsel and was advised that he is under no obligation to present himself to the Hawks.

Hlophe says people have fallen victims of the conspiratorial context of the issue.

There is a narrative that says because Pravin Gordhan is playing a significant and sensitive role he cannot be touched, which for me is very unfortunate because it's not the market forces that decide whether someone should be charged but the criminal and justice system.

Dumisani Hlophe, political analyst

I think we are losing the plot here and we might even set a very bad example that says when certain people are perceived to be playing a great role in society then they should not be charged by the justice system.

Dumisani Hlophe, political analyst

University of Cape Town public law lecturer says South Africans have enough evidence to see that there no evidence and crimes against Gordhan.

She says it is clear that there is conspiracy and South Africans should protect all their institutions including the minister of finance.

What they seem to forget is that the Hawks is not above the law either. The Hawks may only exercise power on the basis of a powering legislation that is constitutional. One of those things is that they can't be ordering people to come before them and make any statements unless they have a crime that they are investigating and have reasonable basis for that crime.

Cathy Powell, UCT public law lecturer

They haven't mentioned any crimes. And they haven't provided any evidence that Pravin Gordhan has a case to answer. There is something very wrong with them telling Pravin Gordhan to turn up at their office any time. They are the ones who are not before the law.

Cathy Powell, UCT public law lecturer

Listen to the full interview below...

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