Africa Connected

Wildlife still the biggest drawcard for tourism to Kenya

Tourism is one of Kenya’s largest foreign exchange earner - behind agriculture - and followed by flowers, tea and coffee.

This statistic is not an anomaly - as much as 7,5% of all Kenyan land (just over 580 000 square kilometers) is set aside for wildlife conservation.

Visitors to the East African country increased by 14 per cent in the first four months of this year, possibly signalling an upturn after a four-year slump over security concerns.

The protected areas embrace various types of ecosystems namely: forests, wetlands, savannah, mountains, marine, arid and semi-arid. According to the Kenyan Travel Tips website, together with safaris, the country’s other major tourist attractions are the coastal beaches. And those tourists come primarily from UK, US and then Italy or Germany.

A diverse range of ecosystems create a great range of opportunities for niche tourists like photographers - wanting to capture the migration across the Serengeti, the untouched splendour of the Masai Mara or highlights in neighbouring countries.

A company who has been delivering specialist tours of this nature is WildEye - started in South Africa back in 2011 this company has expanded it's product far beyond simple safaris!

(Africa Connected even used their specialist tour guide service while sightseeing in Nairobi.)

Before leaving Joburg, Nikiwe chatted to WildEye's Jono Buffey and then on a morning safari in Nairobi National Park on her last day chatted to Kenyan colleague Isaac Kinjanyui...

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