Medical experts optimistic about new HIV vaccine

Director of the Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa, Professor Salim Abdool Karim, says he is very optimistic that the new HIV vaccine being tested in South Africa this week will show positive results.

He says it will take about five to six years to see the results.

The study, called HVTN 702, aims to enroll 5400 sexually active men and women between the ages of 18 and 35.

It will be the largest and most advanced HIV vaccine clinical trial to take place in South Africa.

Even if this vaccine reaches 50% protection or 60% protection, that is much better than 0% protection we have from any other kind of vaccine. It will be an important step to the right direction and major step forward.

Professor Salim Abdool Karim, Director of the Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa

He says South Africa will continue to ensure that South Africa is involved in testing different vaccines.


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