Radio gave me an escape to dream, reminisces legend Bob Mabena

Veteran broadcaster and musician Bob Mabena says his love for radio began at a very young age as an escape from his surroundings.

I found radio. It gave me that escapism. I could dream.

Bob Mabena

I always thought I would be a lawyer, a radio DJ or musician.

Bob Mabena

He has been in the broadcasting business for 27 years of his life, with stints at then Radio Bop in Mabatho, Mafikeng, Metro FM, 947, and now works at Kaya FM.

He says the radio bug has bitten him and there is no turning back.

Radio is crazy. I always say it's like syphilis or gonorrhea - it never leaves you.

Bob Mabena

Mabena, who is affectionately known as Uncle Bob, explains that he got the name from a young listener on his Breakfast Show.

The veteran radio jock says his love for Jack Daniels whiskey began back during his days at Radio Bob, which employed a close-knit community of broadcast lovers.

It was a compound. The only thing missing at Mabatho was a passport to get there.... We shared the love for radio, when it was still fresh, vibrant, with funky music and called 'wireless'

Bob Mabena

Mabena spoke about the sound of radio back then, his musical flare, relationship with fame and plans for the future.

A radio maven today, Mabena has become a radio consultant and is highly respected for his contribution to broadcasting.

Callers and radio personalities Melanie Bala and DJ Fresh also shared fond memories of Mabena.

Bob was the most gracious co-host I could have ever had.

Melanie Bala

When I met Bob I was 19/20, starting out with plans to take radio to the next level. Bob was always patient and always had time for me. He's always been this cool, likable guy.

DJ Fresh

Take a listen to the inspiring conversation:

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