#WaterWatch

Environmental scientist supports CT mayor's disaster water crisis call

The City of Cape Town is considering additional plans to intensify level 3 water restrictions, amid a bid to declare the City an emergency disaster area.

Earlier, Cape Town Mayor Patricia De Lille, announced plans to write to the environmental affairs MEC to declare Cape Town an emergency disaster area.

Briefing media and other parties, De Lille said the City is in a crisis, with the average dam level now at 33%.

Dr Kevin Winter of the Future Water Institute was at the briefing.

Short and medium term plans have so far helped reduce water consumption in the city - decreasing water consumption by 27%.

Further water restrictions will likely in the near future include no irrigation and no topping up of swimming pools.

Winter says he is impressed by the comprehensive approach that the city has taken in addressing the issue.

It brought home two realities - the water crisis and the intent of the City to write to Minister Anton Bredell to declare Cape Town a disaster.

Dr Kevin Winter, Researcher

The other wake up call was the recognition that we now need to be much more proactive in the way in which we are integrating our water sources and the different sources that we need to call on now in the near future.

Dr Kevin Winter, Researcher at UCT's Future Water Institute

There is still no clarity whether there is funding to continue with the implementation of the Table Mountain Group (TMG) aquifer scheme to between 2022 and 2026.

I would hope to see at some stage - if we are bringing it forward, what those timelines and planning is all about because it’s certainly not in any City budget that I have seen so far.

Dr Kevin Winter, Researcher at UCT's Future Water Institute

Winter says the rainfall predictions remain uncertain, but control of water use needs to be tightened.

De Lille is hoping national government will free funds to enable the municipality to implement new water supply schemes.

Click below to listen to the full interview...


This article first appeared on CapeTalk : Environmental scientist supports CT mayor's disaster water crisis call


702 welcomes all comments that are constructive, contribute to discussions in a meaningful manner and take stories forward.

However, we will NOT condone the following:

  • Racism (including offensive comments based on ethnicity and nationality)
  • Sexism
  • Homophobia
  • Religious intolerance
  • Cyber bullying
  • Hate speech
  • Derogatory language
  • Comments inciting violence.

We ask that your comments remain relevant to the articles they appear on and do not include general banter or conversation as this dilutes the effectiveness of the comments section.

We strive to make the 702 community a safe and welcoming space for all.

702 reserves the right to: 1) remove any comments that do not follow the above guidelines; and, 2) ban users who repeatedly infringe the rules.

Should you find any comments upsetting or offensive you can also flag them and we will assess it against our guidelines.

702 is constantly reviewing its comments policy in order to create an environment conducive to constructive conversations.

Read More
What are the legal implications of naming and shaming water wasting culprits?

What are the legal implications of naming and shaming water wasting culprits?

36 fines were issued last week to consumers guilty of contravening water restrictions in Cape Town.

De Lille raises alarm bells over Cape water crisis, proposes new measures

De Lille raises alarm bells over Cape water crisis, proposes new measures

Mayor Patricia De Lille wants to declare Cape Town a 'proactive disaster area' in order to secure funding for interventions.

Map of Top 100 water wasters (identified by streets)

Map of Top 100 water wasters (identified by streets)

Here are the worst water offenders in Cape Town named and shamed by street.

CT drought has no significant affect on underground water - Groundwater Division

CT drought has no significant affect on underground water - Groundwater Division

Kieno Kamies finds out from Dr Roger Parsons if underground water is safe to use for agricultural and domestic purposes.

Average dam level drops to 31% in Western Cape

Average dam level drops to 31% in Western Cape

The Local Government Department says it is working hard to encourage water saving.

Popular articles
7 tips on how to keep your child safe in public

7 tips on how to keep your child safe in public

Social worker and Childline manager Faiza Khota shares practical advise on how to help protect children in public spaces.

Soon you may not be able to light up in public (indoors or out!)

Soon you may not be able to light up in public (indoors or out!)

The Dept of Health is looking to introduce draft legislation that includes a complete ban on all smoking in public areas.

'KZN nudist beach would be a draw card for international tourism'

'KZN nudist beach would be a draw card for international tourism'

Chairman of KZN Naturists Association Christo Bothma says having the section of the South Coast beach will boost the economy.

New drug known as 'flakka' hits Durban

New drug known as 'flakka' hits Durban

Sam Pillay, founder and director of Anti-Drug Forum SA says once the drug takes effect, the user appears possessed.

The President's Keepers: PDF version is tantamount to theft - Exclusive Books

The President's Keepers: PDF version is tantamount to theft - Exclusive Books

A PDF version of the book has been doing the rounds since Sars and the State Security Agency threatened legal action.

Falling out of love? Signs and stages of romantic disengagement

Falling out of love? Signs and stages of romantic disengagement

Can you love your partner, but no longer be in love with them? Dr Eve unravels stages of disaffection in romantic relationships.

Celibacy liberated me - Amanda Ndiki

Celibacy liberated me - Amanda Ndiki

Author Amanda Ndiki, celibate for 6 years describes her journey and how celibacy helped mend her sense of self.

'The university degree is dead'

'The university degree is dead'

Flux Trends founder Dion Chang gives five reasons why he believes getting a degree is past its sell by date.