Life expectancy up and mortality rate down 3%, says Stats SA boss

Statistics South Africa says 460 236 deaths were recorded in 2015 which marks a 3% decline compared to the previous period.

Statistician-General Dr Pali Lehohla has released the latest mortality rates and causes of death report.

Lehohla explains that mortality statistics provide information about how to improve life expectancy.

You need to know why they died so that you know how to save the living.

Pali Lehohla, Statistician-General at StatsSA

South African life expectancy has increased to an average of 65 years; 61.7 years for men, 67 years for women.

According to Lehohla, Stats SA is seeing fewer deaths in an increasing population.

Stats SA classifies deaths according to communicable and non-communicable diseases, as well as injuries linked to unnatural causes of death like assault, car accidents and suicide.

According to Stats SA, the three leading causes of death for 2015 in South Africa were TB, diabetes and cerebrovascular disease.

Lehohla unpacks the differences across race, sex, age and geography.

Take a listen:


This article first appeared on CapeTalk : Life expectancy up and mortality rate down 3%, says Stats SA boss


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