Deafness remains unseen but carries a huge cost and burden on society

Children with deafness are usually diagnosed late. This is an observation made by Dr Victor De Andrade, Audiologist at Wits University. He says deafness remains invisible in societies because it's a condition that is unseen and only felt by the bearer.

He says deafness is also overlooked when it comes to allocation of resources and funds, providing for people who are deaf.

There is personal cost when the person is being excluded from society and communication, being excluded from participation in events because of deafness.

Dr Victor De Andrade, Audiologist at Wits University

People who are deaf tend to have higher rate of unemployment because its not easy to get a job when you are deaf.

Dr Victor De Andrade, Audiologist at Wits University

Because children with deafness are mostly diagnosed late, that means a lot money needs to be spent on helping these children catch-up on ways to communicate, he says.

He says there's insufficient awareness on deafness because parents often think the child will eventually speak and by the time they realise that the child is actually deaf, it's late.

World hearing Day is celebrated on the 2nd of March and this year's theme was “Action for hearing loss: makes a sound investment”.

To hear more about deafness, listen below:


This article first appeared on CapeTalk : Deafness remains unseen but carries a huge cost and burden on society


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