Debora Patta reveals how South African news makes it onto the global radar

South Africa's so-called political crises, controversies surrounding President Jacob Zuma's leadership, as well as the more recent International Criminal Courts (ICC) debacle have placed the country on the radar of international news.

But who really cares?

Foreign correspondents Debora Patta and Erin Conway Smith have been at the forefront off disseminating news about some of the goings-on back home, to a global audience.

Patta works as the Africa correspondent for the American TV network CBS and Smith is the Southern Africa correspondent for The Economist.

The two have given their views on big local stories and how these resonate abroad.

South Africa’s approach to the ICC sort of speaks to its changing foreign policy but also how its viewed overseas is that South Africa is shedding its moral authority.

rin Conway Smith, correspondent for the Economist

On this particularly one they [Americans] don’t care because the ICC doesn’t resonate.

Debora Patta, correspondent for CBS News

I understand why people are critical if the ICC because there is a lot of hypocrisy involved in how we hold world leaders to account but if you have nothing else then there is no recourse.

Debora Patta, correspondent for CBS News

Patta who is a prominent figure in South Africa's broadcast industry explains how her experience as a correspondent has revealed some of what is wrong with local journalism.

I think the biggest and most significant change, and it's a damming indictment on us as South African media, is that I have done far more African stories for them than I ever did working for a South African media outlet.

Debora Patta, correspondent for CBS News

She says South African media don't cover African stories enough.

Resources are a factor. It's expensive to travel but it’s also because we don’t understand and we don’t know.

Debora Patta, correspondent for CBS News

Africa should be on our minds even if we don’t get to African countries we can get fixers and stringers in those countries.we just don’t care, we are not interested.

Debora Patta, correspondent for CBS News

Listen to the full interview below...


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