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Media must interrogate itself - analyst

1 April 2017 7:22 AM
Political analyst David Maimela shares his opinion after criticism of biased media reporting over Zuma's Cabinet reshuffle.

The media need to interrogate their own reporting and adopt a healthy level of skepticism when covering news stories, says political analyst David Maimela.

This comes after some people accused media of bias in reporting on President Jacob Zuma's Cabinet reshuffle.

Also read: "It would have been nice to receive a phonecall" - Gordhan

Maimela explained that an inability to interrogate information can lead to complacency among journalists.

It doesn't matter where you are and what issues you cover. What is important is whether you doubt your own narrative and asks questions about whether you are right.

David Maimela, Researcher at the Mapungubwe Institute for Strategic Reflection

The first port of call is to doubt your own truth, doubt your own narrative and questioning.

David Maimela, Researcher at the Mapungubwe Institute for Strategic Reflection

The minuet you think that you are always right, there's a possibility that you have begun to stagnate.

David Maimela, Researcher at the Mapungubwe Institute for Strategic Reflection

He spoke with NighTalk's Lovelyn Nwadeyi about media self-critique when reporting, particularly on critical sociopolitical issues of public interest.

Take a listen:


This article first appeared on CapeTalk : Media must interrogate itself - analyst


1 April 2017 7:22 AM