Sale and use of booze at Cape schools gets green light

The Western Cape Provincial School Education Amendment Bill has been approved by Cabinet in the province.

An aspect of this bill will allow the sale and use of alcohol on school grounds once again. However, this will come with strict conditions.

MEC for Education in the Western Cape, Debbie Schafer, says the intention of the bill is to allow the sale of alcohol during functions and allow it with certain conditions.

She says there are schools that are renting out their halls for outside functions to make extra revenue for the school and this will help them to act within limits.

The bill was amended as a result of public comment, says Schafer. She says the school can only get permission to sell alcohol if they apply to the head of the department (HOD).

The principal can apply if it is a staff function otherwise the SGB have to apply.

Debbie Schäfer, Western Cape Education MEC

The SGB, HOD and the principal can together put all the conditions in place, adds Schafer.

She says the HOD is expected to consider the Provincial Alcohol Reduction Policy when granting permission.

To hear more of this interview, listen below:


This article first appeared on CapeTalk : Sale and use of booze at Cape schools gets green light


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