Housing rental app allows tenants to bid what they're willing to pay

A housing rental app called Houseme has been launched with the aim to help people to find accommodation online and landlords to rent out their places.

Ben Shaw, House ME co-founder, says the app is completely transparent, charges a small percentage and allows tenants to bid on what they are willing to pay.

We connecting landlords and tenants and we also offer rental guarantee. We do credit checks and screening of tenants absolutely free.

Ben Shaw, House ME co-founder

HouseME tenants only have to pay one month's rental deposit, says Shaw.

To find out how visit their website.

To hear more about HouseME, listen below:


This article first appeared on CapeTalk : Housing rental app allows tenants to bid what they're willing to pay


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