Technobyte: Kwesé Play streaming box includes Netflix for Africa

African media company Kwesé and Netflix, the world’s leading internet entertainment service, have launched a long-term partnership for Sub-Saharan Africa, leveraging Kwesé’s pan-African reach to help make it easier for African consumers to enjoy Netflix.

The Kwesé Play streaming box is the first set-top box in Africa to officially include Netflix service. It is powered by Roku, meaning it has a best in class user interface, and there is a dedicated Netflix button on the remote control giving consumers the ability to access their favorite show with a simple click. At launch, Kwesé Play customers in South Africa will be offered an exclusive, three-month gift subscription to Netflix with their purchase.

The initial cost is R1599 for the Roku box and with that you get a free three-month subscription to Netflix. There after the cost is R164.99 per month and that includes access to over 100 channels.

www.kwese.com

A new competition to encourage innovators to create a safe and easy-to-use personal flying device was launched one of the aerospace industry’s premiere engineering technology conferences, SAE 2017 AeroTech Congres. The two-year competition, managed by GoFly with Boeing as Grand Sponsor, encourages teams from around the world to leverage recent advances in propulsion, energy, light-weight materials, and control and stability systems to make the dream of personal flight a reality.

Prize money of $2M will be awarded to the most innovative teams. Teams will be challenged to create a personal flying device that can be used by anyone, anywhere. GoFly is calling upon the world’s greatest thinkers, designers, engineers, inventors and builders to construct safe, ultra-compact, quiet, urban-compatible, personal flying devices capable of carrying a person 20 miles without refueling or recharging with vertical, or near vertical take-off and landing capability.

GoFly will provide teams with access to experienced Mentors and Masters in design, engineering, finance, law, and marketing, but the ultimate design and functionality of the device will be up to the imagination of the competitors.

www.GoFlyPrize.com

By adapting a technology used to build electronic components, researchers at the University of Michigan have developed a new way to manufacture medication. The technique could eventually allow hospitals, pharmacies, and doctor's offices to print drugs on demand, mixing different medications into one easy-to-administer dose. This latest technique was adapted from organic vapor-jet printing, a method of manufacturing electronics by depositing fine crystals of a material onto a substrate surface.

To print their medication, the Michigan researchers heated a powdered form of the active pharmaceutical ingredient until it evaporated, where it then combines with a heated inert gas. That mixture is then funnelled through a nozzle and deposited onto a chilled surface, where it cools to form a thin crystalline film.

The crystalline structure of ibuprofen, as manufactured using organic vapor-jet printing. In their tests, the researchers showed that medication printed in this way was just as effective at killing lab-grown cancer cells as other medication, but there are a few advantages unique to this technique. According to the researchers, it allows the drug to dissolve more easily without adding other solvents or chemicals, which not only helps the patient absorb the medicine, but could help drugs pass the rigorous screening processes standing between them and mainstream adoption.

newatlas.com


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