Animal slaughter in the suburbs

The slaughtering of animals is a fundamental aspect of the economic, social and spiritual life of many people in South Africa. And historically under apartheid, these events generally occurred in rural areas or urban townships designated for black people.

Since the transition to democracy in the early 90's, increased suburban mixing has exposed established middle-class residents, particularly white people the slaughter of animals and cultures of other people says 702 host Azania Mosaka.

Scott Burnett is a PhD Candidate at Wits Centre for Diversity Studies and says he is looking at the ways racial divisions in South Africa. Specifically, he says the ongoing power of white people is reproduced through some ideas about what is appropriate or inappropriate in some spaces, what the best way to protect the environment is, and what is the correct way to handle animals.

He explains, that as a resident of Melville, Johannesburg and watching a conversation explode on the Facebook page 'I Love Melville' on the slaughtering of animals he felt compelled to tackle the subject.

One resident took to the "I Love Melville" Facebook site to ask for advice: where should she report this? She had spoken to the police, but they referred her to the SPCA. Can we find proof that the animals suffered? Had by-laws been broken? Other residents weighed in. Report it to the DA counsellor, advised one. How was the rest of the carcass disposed of? The sight was 'offensive', said one; 'traumatising', said another. Had the nearby stream been polluted? It was clear: a crime had been committed. There was just a bit of debate as to which law exactly had been broken.

Scott Burnett is a PHD Candidate at Wits Centre for Diversity Studies

People are used to a particular way of being and what they're used to is a conditioning of our racial past. So when white people see things done differently, very often their reaction is to resist that and on a level is a form of keeping certain individuals, such as poor and black people out of those neighbourhoods.

Scott Burnett is a PHD Candidate at Wits Centre for Diversity Studies

Burnett says the conversation on that Facebook page was an offence first, and then only later did people try to figure which rule was broken.

We need to be a little bit more open to seeing people doing different things and accepting that we live in a country that is defined by its diversity and not jumping to calling the SPCA or the police because it makes you uncomfortable, says Burnett.

We're willing to tolerate mass slaughter like factory scale animal slaughter, as long as it is out of sight and out mind because we think that is part of civilisation. However the minute someone is butchering an animal down the road from us, black people specifically, it is suddenly an offence.

Scott Burnett is a PHD Candidate at Wits Centre for Diversity Studies

Listen to the full conversation in the clip below:


Recommended

by NEWSROOM AI

702 welcomes all comments that are constructive, contribute to discussions in a meaningful manner and take stories forward.

However, we will NOT condone the following:

  • Racism (including offensive comments based on ethnicity and nationality)
  • Sexism
  • Homophobia
  • Religious intolerance
  • Cyber bullying
  • Hate speech
  • Derogatory language
  • Comments inciting violence.

We ask that your comments remain relevant to the articles they appear on and do not include general banter or conversation as this dilutes the effectiveness of the comments section.

We strive to make the 702 community a safe and welcoming space for all.

702 reserves the right to: 1) remove any comments that do not follow the above guidelines; and, 2) ban users who repeatedly infringe the rules.

Should you find any comments upsetting or offensive you can also flag them and we will assess it against our guidelines.

702 is constantly reviewing its comments policy in order to create an environment conducive to constructive conversations.

Read More
'We bring financial literacy to the communities'

'We bring financial literacy to the communities'

PM Skillshouse Founder Portia Malatjie says her company specialises in financial literacy.

[WATCH] MasterChef Australia judges are here ready for AppetiteFest SA

[WATCH] MasterChef Australia judges are here ready for AppetiteFest SA

MasterChef Australia judges share their fondest things to do in SA and what they like to eat on the plane.

#702Unplugged: Musa performs tracks from his brand new album

#702Unplugged: Musa performs tracks from his brand new album

The self-titled 12 track album is Musa's first project without his mentor Robbie Malinga.

 The law must change to enable the donation of tons of food going to waste

The law must change to enable the donation of tons of food going to waste

Tatjana von Bormann says the sell-by date and the use by dates are indeed one of the causes unnecessary food waste.

'Citizens have a right to ask for identification from police during a roadblock'

'Citizens have a right to ask for identification from police during a roadblock'

Major General Michael Mohlala explains the procedure of conducting a roadblock and what to do when you are stopped.

The psychology of being unemployed

The psychology of being unemployed

Performance coach Gielie Hoffmann speaks about what goes through a person's mind when they are unemployed.

Popular articles
 In the market for a 2nd hand car? Here are some tips to buy it on a budget!

In the market for a 2nd hand car? Here are some tips to buy it on a budget!

In the car feature, our very own car guy Tumelo Maketekete shares some tips and tricks to buying a car on a R100 000 budget.

Vigilante mob attacks alleged criminals in Daveyton

Vigilante mob attacks alleged criminals in Daveyton

Tensions are rife in the East Joburg township as the community attacked and killed criminals.

[Listen] Lottery responds to Tshepo's fraud claims

[Listen] Lottery responds to Tshepo's fraud claims

Philemon Letwaba says Tshepo's case relates to some of the issues that they are dealing with on a daily basis.

'Citizens have a right to ask for identification from police during a roadblock'

'Citizens have a right to ask for identification from police during a roadblock'

Major General Michael Mohlala explains the procedure of conducting a roadblock and what to do when you are stopped.

Gift of the Givers' Dr Imtiaz Sooliman – angel amongst men – talks about money

Gift of the Givers' Dr Imtiaz Sooliman – angel amongst men – talks about money

"I have no desire for clothes. I have no desire for holidays. I have no desire for outings. All I see is the suffering of people…"