Technobyte

Technobyte: The SMS turns 25-years-old!

SMS turns 25

Be prepared to feel ancient. The first text message is 25 years old.

Engineer Neil Papworth sent the first SMS on 3 December 1992, when he wrote "Merry Christmas" on a computer and sent it to the cellphone of Vodafone director Richard Jarvis. It was a modest start, but it ultimately changed technology and even social norms.

It took a long time for SMS to find widespread adoption, both because of the cellular networks themselves (coverage was far from ubiquitous in 1992), and phones whose buttons revolved around dialing rather than typing.

But then the smartphone arrived, and the rest, as they say, is history.

www.engadget.com

The surgeon who wants to connect you to the internet with a brain implant.

Eric Leuthardt believes that in the near future we will allow doctors to insert electrodes into our brains so we can communicate directly with computers and each other.

www.technologyreview.com

Mining future may be devoid of humans

Some mines in the next decade will run without humans and instead rely on robots, virtual models, and sensors, according to Anglo American Plc.

Anglo is betting on technology, such as computerised drills with "chiseling ability as good as a human" to increase productivity, cut costs and reduce environmental impact, Tony O’Neill, technical director at Anglo, said at the Mines and Money conference in London.

www.bloomberg.com

Will Google Street maps predict how people will vote?

Google Maps’ Street View feature is a great way to explore the world around you, but could it be revealing more about your neighborhood than you think?

That’s quite possible, suggests new research coming out of Stanford University.

Computer science researchers there, have been demonstrating how deep learning artificial intelligence can scour the images on Google Street View and draw conclusions about issues like the political leaning of a particular area — just by looking at the cars parked out on the street.

www.digitaltrends.com


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