Ground-breaking Sterkfontein discovery turns crucial page in story of humankind

South Africa’s status as a major cradle in the African nursery of humankind has been reinforced with today’s unveiling of “Little Foot”, the country’s oldest, virtually complete fossil human ancestor.

Little Foot is the only known virtually complete Australopithecus fossil discovered to date. It is by far the most complete skeleton of a human ancestor older than 1.5 million years ever found.

It is also the oldest fossil hominid in Southern Africa, dating back 3.67 million years.

The unveiling will be the first time that the completely cleaned and reconstructed skeleton can be viewed by the national and international media.

Discovered by Professor Ron Clarke from the Evolutionary Studies Institute at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa, the fossil was given the nickname of “Little Foot” by Prof. Phillip Tobias, based on Clarke’s initial discovery of four small foot bones.

Its discovery is expected to add a wealth of knowledge about the appearance, full skeletal anatomy, limb lengths and locomotor abilities of one of the species of our early ancestral relatives.

“This is one of the most remarkable fossil discoveries made in the history of human origins research and it is a privilege to unveil a finding of this importance today.”

Professor Ron Clarke

After lying undiscovered for more than 3.6 million years deep within the Sterkfontein caves about 40km north-west of Johannesburg, Clarke found several foot bones and lower leg bone fragments in 1994 and 1997. These were found among other fossils that had been removed from rock blasted from the cave years earlier by lime miners.

Clarke sent his assistants Stephen Motsumi and Nkwane Molefe into the deep underground cave to search for any possible broken bone surface that might fit with the bones he had discovered in boxes. And within two days of searching, they found such a contact in July 1997.

In the 20 years since the discovery, they have been hard at work excavating and preparing the fossil. Now Clarke and a team of international experts are conducting a full set of scientific studies on it.

The results of these studies are expected to be published in a series of scientific papers in high impact, peer-reviewed international journals in the near future.

Clarke realised soon after the discovery that they were on to something highly significant and started the specialised process of excavating the skeleton in the cave up through 2012 when the last visible elements were removed to the surface in blocks of breccia.

My assistants and I have worked on painstakingly cleaning the bones from breccia blocks and reconstructing the full skeleton until the present day.

Professor Ron Clarke

This is the first time that a virtually complete skeleton of a pre-human ancestor from a South African cave has been excavated in the place where it was fossilised.

Many of the bones of the skeleton are fragile, yet they were all deeply embedded in a concrete-like rock called breccia. The process required extremely careful excavation in the dark environment of the cave. Once the upward-facing surfaces of the skeleton’s bones were exposed, the breccia in which their undersides were still embedded had to be carefully undercut and removed in blocks for further cleaning in the lab at Sterkfontein.

Professor Ron Clarke

The 20-year long period of excavation, cleaning, reconstruction, casting, and analysis of the skeleton has required a steady source of funding. This has been provided by the Palaeontological Scientific Trust (PastAST) – a Johannesburg-based NGO that promotes research, education, and outreach in the sciences related to our origins.

Among its many initiatives aimed at uplifting the origin sciences across Africa, Past has been a major funder of research at Sterkfontein for over two decades.

This is a landmark achievement for the global scientific community and South Africa’s heritage. It is through important discoveries like Little Foot that we obtain a glimpse into our past which helps us to better understand our common humanity.

Professor Adam Habib, Vice-Chancellor and Principal of the University of the Witwatersrand

The scientific value of the find and much more will be unveiled in a series of papers that Prof Clarke and a team of international experts have been preparing, with many expected in the next year.

Not only is Africa the storehouse of the ancient fossil heritage for people the world over, it was also the wellspring of everything that makes us human, including our technological prowess, our artistic ability, and our supreme intellect.

PAST’s chief scientist Professor Robert Blumenschine

Find out more about P.A.S.T's work here


This article first appeared on LeadSA : Ground-breaking Sterkfontein discovery turns crucial page in story of humankind


702 welcomes all comments that are constructive, contribute to discussions in a meaningful manner and take stories forward.

However, we will NOT condone the following:

  • Racism (including offensive comments based on ethnicity and nationality)
  • Sexism
  • Homophobia
  • Religious intolerance
  • Cyber bullying
  • Hate speech
  • Derogatory language
  • Comments inciting violence.

We ask that your comments remain relevant to the articles they appear on and do not include general banter or conversation as this dilutes the effectiveness of the comments section.

We strive to make the 702 community a safe and welcoming space for all.

702 reserves the right to: 1) remove any comments that do not follow the above guidelines; and, 2) ban users who repeatedly infringe the rules.

Should you find any comments upsetting or offensive you can also flag them and we will assess it against our guidelines.

702 is constantly reviewing its comments policy in order to create an environment conducive to constructive conversations.

Read More
It takes more than a hashtag to put an end to violence against women.

It takes more than a hashtag to put an end to violence against women.

Hub for survivors of abuse and the organisations that can assist them is launched in time for 16 Days of activism

CT teen proves skeptics wrong while making diving history

CT teen proves skeptics wrong while making diving history

Despite doubts from skeptics, Kimlee Campher is on her way to making diving history in Hout Bay thanks to her determination.

This Facebook chat will answer all your Alzheimer’s and dementia questions

This Facebook chat will answer all your Alzheimer’s and dementia questions

If you have a patient or loved one who suffers from Dementia or Alzheimer’s, feel free to join in on the #FacebookFriday Q&A.

Heidelberg local's unique sidewalk veggie patch helps feed the hungry

Heidelberg local's unique sidewalk veggie patch helps feed the hungry

Some exceptional South Africans go the extra mile when faced with the plight of the poor and put their compassion into action.

SHOUT Opens Libraries in Tembisa and Shoshanguve

SHOUT Opens Libraries in Tembisa and Shoshanguve

The SHOUT Foundation was founded by popular South African artists Danny K and Kabelo Mabalane.

SA  loses bid to host the #2023 Rugby World Cup to France

SA loses bid to host the #2023 Rugby World Cup to France

France won the bid ahead of SA and Ireland, World Rugby announced in London.

Popular articles
This tech institute forges top coding talent in SA - for free

This tech institute forges top coding talent in SA - for free

WeThinkCode funds top human talent with the potential to become the future coders of SA, despite their background or experience.

Dr Mbuyiseni Ndlozi opens up about his thesis

Dr Mbuyiseni Ndlozi opens up about his thesis

Ndlozi explains the significance of the the first chapter of his thesis: 'Trauma in the archives'.

German prosecutors probing Steinhoff CEO Markus Jooste (for accounting fraud)

German prosecutors probing Steinhoff CEO Markus Jooste (for accounting fraud)

The Money Show’s Bruce Whitfield interviews Steinhoff International Chairperson Christo Wiese.

Happy 50th birthday, Pick n Pay (congrats on growing your bottom line by 18%)!

Happy 50th birthday, Pick n Pay (congrats on growing your bottom line by 18%)!

50 years ago the retailer started out when Raymond Ackerman bought three tiny stores from Click founder Jack Goldin.

So what exactly is radical economic transformation?

So what exactly is radical economic transformation?

Wits associate professor of economics Christopher Malikane speaks to Azania Mosaka about the term that is being bandied about.

Is it normal to have a curved penis? Dr Shingai explains

Is it normal to have a curved penis? Dr Shingai explains

Urologist Dr Shingai Mutambirwa says penile curvature is only a concern if it impedes a man's ability to have penetrative sex.

Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma's simply did not do her job as  AU chair - analyst

Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma's simply did not do her job as AU chair - analyst

Analysts weigh-in with very different views on Dlamini Zuma's failures and achievements as chairperson of the African Union.

Who is Advocate Tembeka Ngcukaitobi?

Who is Advocate Tembeka Ngcukaitobi?

The EFF lawyer stole the show during the state capture report court battle.

3 easy questions could bag you R2000!

3 easy questions could bag you R2000!

WIN R2000! But only if you can prove you're a whiz of the MTN Biz Quiz by answering the following three questions...

Blesserfinder: Matching you with a sugar daddy near you

Blesserfinder: Matching you with a sugar daddy near you

Is social trend Blesserfinder, where girls are allegedly matching up with rich 'benefactors' in exchange for sex, a real thing?