Make Money Mondays

'We gave away 800 refurbished suits for people going to an interview'

Some students struggle to put a meal on the table.

Lindiwe Temba, Nedbank

We’re going to, literally, change lives…

Gareth Armstrong, RMB

You bring in your old suit… we refurbish and distribute them…

Mohammed Moosa, Khaliques

We offer business coaching to a group of women.

Dikeledi Seoloane, Matsobanemetja Business Consulting

Some companies do well.

Some do well, and good.

Every Monday on The Money Show, Bruce Whitfield interviews someone from a business that makes a difference as part of his weekly “Make a Difference Mondays” feature.

“Make a Difference Mondays” is all about businesses – no matter how big, or small - that are socially aware, and doing good work.

It’s about businesses that are innovative in the way they are making a positive difference in the world; perhaps even sacrificing profit to do so.

This week Whitfield interviewed Lindiwe Temba, Divisional Executive of Corporate Social Responsibility at Nedbank.

She spoke about Nedbank’s “Get to Graduation” program.

Whitfield also spoke to Gareth Armstrong, Corporate Finance Transactor at Rand Merchant Bank (RMB).

Amstrong discussed RMB’s “Surgeons for Little Lives”.

Whitfield then gave two inspirational small businesses the floor.

The one - Khaliques - refurbishes old suits, then gives them to people who can't afford one, but need one for an interview.

The other - Matsobanemetja Business Consulting - offers free business coaching to empower women.

Listen to the interviews in the audio below (and/or scroll down for more quotes from it).

If money is loaded, it’s loaded specifically for groceries and nothing else.

Lindiwe Temba, Nedbank

There is no contractual obligations for the students at all.

Lindiwe Temba, Nedbank

This falls outside of our traditional CSI spend.

Gareth Armstrong, RMB

It’s absolutely not an obligation…

Gareth Armstrong, RMB

It’s more meaningful than handing over a cheque…

Gareth Armstrong, RMB

Bruce, we actually do give money away.

Mohammed Moosa, Khaliques

This year we gave away 800 suits for people going for an interview.

Mohammed Moosa, Khaliques

We want to try and employ 10 000 people in the retail sector… We’ve taken 20 graduates… We pay them a salary, and train and mentor them…

Mohammed Moosa, Khaliques

I’m empowering myself! It’s also helpful to me as well.

Dikeledi Seoloane, Matsobanemetja Business Consulting

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