Book details how support group grew to help SA's young anti-apartheid activists

A new book called 'The Knock on the Door' describes the moving story of a small parent support group that grew into a national organisation during apartheid.

The book details how the the Detainees Parents Support Committee (DPSC) was born and how it exposed injustices faced by apartheid prisoners.

The organisation supported families whose loved ones had been jailed, and also helped draw international attention to the atrocities being committed in South African prisons.

The story of anti-apartheid activist Keith Coleman and his mother is one of the stories shared in the book, and interwoven with history of DPSC.

The DPSC was born in 1981, after police imprisoned a number of young anti-apartheid activists without trial or even legal representation, and Coleman was among those sent to jail.

His mother and several other parents would then form DPSC, which became a political force to be reckoned with.

I was an activist from my universities days in 1978. Together with others, we started a newspaper called Saspu National.

Keith Coleman, anti-apartheid activist

The newspaper exposed what was going on in townships. We took photographs of police doing terrible things, worked with unions and brought to light what unreported.

Keith Coleman, anti-apartheid activist

I ended up in solitary confinement for five months. A friend of hours was in detention for three years.

Keith Coleman, anti-apartheid activist

We were very proud of his newspaper cause it was revealing the repression in the country.

Audrey Coleman, member of the Detainees Parents Support Committee

It was parents and loved ones who heard that we were meeting at the university. We all came together and started a group.

Audrey Coleman, member of the Detainees Parents Support Committee

David Webster, who was later assassinated, was one of the people who gave us a home at the university to meet.

Audrey Coleman, member of the Detainees Parents Support Committee

The group began to work out how we could come to the aid of our loved ones.

Audrey Coleman, member of the Detainees Parents Support Committee

As the detentions became more prolific, we realised our privilege and began giving tracksuits and takkies to other detainees.

Audrey Coleman, member of the Detainees Parents Support Committee

We started collecting the facts, figures and numbers of who was in detention. It slowly snowballed into a very large national organisation.

Audrey Coleman, member of the Detainees Parents Support Committee

Take a listen to the inspiring story:


This article first appeared on CapeTalk : Book details how support group grew to help SA's young anti-apartheid activists


Recommended

by NEWSROOM AI
Read More
Mass shutdown planned for Tuesday across WC

Mass shutdown planned for Tuesday across WC

The Western Cape Total Shutdown Communities want to raise awareness about the socio-economic ills they face on a daily basis.

Global workshop offers ideas on how to build a water resilient Cape Town

Global workshop offers ideas on how to build a water resilient Cape Town

100 Resilient Cities is a project which helps cities worldwide become more resilient to social, economic and climate challenges.

Dignity SA suspects murder case was prompted by those against assisted dying

Dignity SA suspects murder case was prompted by those against assisted dying

The founder of right-to-die organisation, Dignity SA, was arrested for allegedly assisting a friend to take their life in 2013.

You're unlikely to find appliance spares eight years after buying - Hirsch's CEO

You're unlikely to find appliance spares eight years after buying - Hirsch's CEO

For how many years should manufacturers or retailers keep spare parts after you have bought a product? ConsumerTalk investigates.

[LISTEN] Mother of three opens up about perinatal depression

[LISTEN] Mother of three opens up about perinatal depression

Pregnancy and the transition to motherhood can cause stress for many women. This can negatively affect their psychological health.

Concourt ruling on cannabis needs to filter down to cops, says dagga couple

Concourt ruling on cannabis needs to filter down to cops, says dagga couple

Myrtle Clark and Julian Stobbs, dubbed the dagga couple, have been trying for years to have dagga legalised.

Popular articles
Ramaphosa unveils statue of Madiba at UN headquarters

Ramaphosa unveils statue of Madiba at UN headquarters

The 1.9 metre statue is said to be a gift from South Africa to the international community.

KZN Metrorail services suspended due to vandalism

KZN Metrorail services suspended due to vandalism

Metrorail KZN Regional Spokesperson Zama Nomnganga says a build up of events led to the decision.

WC DA leader refuses to hand over electronic devices as party probes media leak

WC DA leader refuses to hand over electronic devices as party probes media leak

Western Cape DA leader Bonginkosi Madikizela confirmed that he was asked to hand over his devices but he says that he refused.

Ramaphosa's new advisory team has 6 months to draw up national land reform plan

Ramaphosa's new advisory team has 6 months to draw up national land reform plan

Land researcher Prof. Ruth Hall says the panel faces an exciting challenge to see how government can fix the land reform process.

[LISTEN] Opinion: 'Thuma Mina dares not fail'

[LISTEN] Opinion: 'Thuma Mina dares not fail'

Breakfast Show host Bongani Bingwa says skeptics are right to question whether Ramaphosa will succeed in his mandate as president.

[WATCH] Is it a cow's penis or an udder? Well, this kid thinks it's a penis

[WATCH] Is it a cow's penis or an udder? Well, this kid thinks it's a penis

Check out the videos, tweets, Facebook posts that have gone viral and why this kid cheered her dad on in the toilet.

Who is Advocate Tembeka Ngcukaitobi?

Who is Advocate Tembeka Ngcukaitobi?

The EFF lawyer stole the show during the state capture report court battle.