'There are a lot of stereotypes around women footballers' - Amanda Dlamini

Former Banyana Banyana captain, Amanda Dlamini said she had to first convince her mother that she can play football - and then had to convince the public that footballers could be highly educated.

She says when she joined the national team she realised that the stereotypes were indeed true, footballers did not have qualifications.

I had to balance my studies with sport because of the stereotypes and labeling that revolved around women and football and football in general. It is said that footballers are uneducated and they don't go to school. And when I got to the national team indeed players had no qualifications and I motivated them then we had a lot of them studying.

Amanda Dlamini

She said she had considered hanging up her boots since 2015, but because football is all she knew she had to rethink her decision.

I was always strict about what I wanted to do, I did not want to play football at the age of 25. Because of the challenges we face as women in football. Our male counterparts are still getting five times more than what we do. Football is all that I have ever known since I was 11 years old. After retiring I had to find my feet, I still am. It has been a tough time for me but I have embraced it.

Amanda Dlamini

Dlamini started Amanda Dlamini Foundation in 2012 aimed at providing help to girls in rural areas.

She says she was introduced to football by her cousin and later joined their team.

One day my cousin's coach came to my house, mom and myself were really stunned because I did not think the coach knew where I lived or think that I had an ability to be part of his team. It was really refreshing. My mom became even strict, I had to come home at 18h00 whether training was done or not. And that was the how our relationship started breaking down - because I was really adamant that I wanted to play football and she did not want that.

Amanda Dlamini

Listen to Amanda Dlamini explaining how and why her mother didn't want her to play football:


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