[LISTEN] When is it OK to tell someone else's story of abuse?

With the scourge of femicide and abuse against women and children in the country, when does it become your duty to tell other people's stories of abuse?

During a live radio show on Metro FM, presenter Masechaba Ndlovu spoke out about the abuse Babes Wodumo had suffered at the hands of her then-boyfriend Mampinsha.

Twitter has been divided on whether Ndlovu was right for exposing the abuse when Wodumo herself had seemed unwilling to talk about it during the interview.

Eusebius McKaiser speaks to legal journalist Karyn Maughan, Radio producer Nolwazi Tusini, TV personality Claire Mawisa and callers to find out when is it your duty to report someone else's story?

READ: Mixed reaction on how Masechaba Ndlovu exposed ‘abusive’ Mampintsha

At no point do I say we should not speak about her abuse, I just wanted to make sure we had protected Babes in this situation.

Claire Mawisa, TV personality and Carte Blanche presenter

My concern was mostly about how Babes was processing this? Was she willing to be outed? This is something she should have driven, the process of disclosing her own abuse and telling her story. That was my main concern because it felt like we are bullying her.

Claire Mawisa, TV personality and Carte Blanche presenter

I am not saying domestic violence is a private matter against two people and should be kept in the family, It is absolutely not.

Nolwazi Tusini, Radio Producer PowerFM, 2016 Ruth First Fellow and writer

Why Masechaba and not Mampintsha? I see women every day do this work to fight domestic violence and gender-based violence in general. So to suggest, in this instance, that we are parking him for a while, in order to focus on one of our own and to suggest that we are letting him off the hook... it offends me and I think it's dishonest.

Nolwazi Tusini, Radio Producer PowerFM, 2016 Ruth First Fellow and writer

I personally believe you have to be a human being first then a journalist second. You don't go tell a story without speaking to the person it directly affects. You can't re-traumatise the victim again.

Karyn Maughan, Senior Legal Journalist at Tiso Blackstar

I have been disturbed that there has been some kind of personal attacks on Masechaba, suggesting that she did this out of the desire to further her career. I think that's very problematic. We all know in the broadcast world that what she did was incredibly risky for her.

Karyn Maughan, Senior Legal Journalist at Tiso Blackstar

Callers on the show also voiced the opinion on the matter.

I felt so disgusted in the way that it was taking place. Look at what's happening now, instead of focusing on the interview and what was going on...here we ware focusing on how the situation happened. It felt like Masechaba was abusing Babes, if she wanted to help she should have gone to the police.

Sizwe, Caller

As an abuse and rape survivor, it took me a while to come out and say this what happened to me. There is a lot of pain and shame that comes with abuse and acknowledging that this is something that happened to me. It would have been fair to say let's empower babes to a point where she will be able to talk about it.

Sipho, Caller

Listen to what other callers had to say...


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