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'Women of 1956 would be sad, they didn't march for what we see now in society'

9 August 2018 10:56 AM
Tags:
Women's Day
1956 womens march
march
Sophie de Bruyn
social ills

Anti-Apartheid struggle stalwart Sophie de Bruyn reflects on the current generation versus that of 1956 that marched to Pretoria.

South Africans are commemorating Women's day today.

In 1956, around 20 000 women marched to the Union Buildings in Pretoria to petition against the pass laws. The law required those defined as black to carry an internal identity document known as a pass.

Sophia Theresa Williams was just 18-years-old on the 9th of August when the women marched to Pretoria. Now, at the age of 80, Sophie de Bruyn is possibly one of the last surviving marchers from that historic day.

Mama Sisulu and all the other women maybe are very sad today wherever they are because this is not what they fought for.

Sophie de Bruyn, Anti-Apartheid struggle stalwart

The disappointment after our independence is a great disappointment to us and I am very sad.

Sophie de Bruyn, Anti-Apartheid struggle stalwart

De Bruyn says the society has failed the marchers of 1956.

When the women marched to the union building 62 years ago without men, they showed the world that they do have the courage and the apartheid regime that was led by men could not divide women.

Sophie de Bruyn, Anti-Apartheid struggle stalwart

We need to stand more united. Women showed last week how angry they are and something has to be done.

Sophie de Bruyn, Anti-Apartheid struggle stalwart

The struggle stalwart says fixing the ills of the society start with us as women on how we socialise our boy children.

She emphasises that the kind of examples shown to children as they grow up has a huge impact on the children's lives.

If we reflect bad examples this is what they pick up.

Sophie de Bruyn, Anti-Apartheid struggle stalwart

We are failing them because we socialise them in a different way. It should start now while they are still young.

Sophie de Bruyn, Anti-Apartheid struggle stalwart

Children don't ask to born, it is the parents that want them. And when they are here these beautiful babies, we turn them into monsters and this must change.

Sophie de Bruyn, Anti-Apartheid struggle stalwart

Listen to Sophie de Bruyn and what Judge Margie Victor has to say about gender-based issues in the legal fraternity below...


9 August 2018 10:56 AM
Tags:
Women's Day
1956 womens march
march
Sophie de Bruyn
social ills

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