Why companies need to be proactive about employee well-being

Companies need to be more intentional about implementing effective employee assistance programmes (EAP).

EAPs are employee benefit programmes that assist employees with personal problems or work-related problems that may impact their job performance, health, mental and emotional well-being.

Read: SA companies ignore staff's mental health at own peril, warns Sadag

Dr Fundile Nyathi, CEO of Proactive Health Solutions, says these EAPs needs to be more than just a tick-box for organisations.

Dr Nyathi says employers need to measure the effectiveness of these programmes, in order for them to be meaningful.

Read more: Company coughs up nearly 5 years' back pay for firing employee with depression

Productivity levels, work attendance, stress-related absence, and regular illness are some of the indicators to consider when assessing workplace wellness.

Dr Nyathi explains investing in employee well-being and providing psycho-social support can be good for business and the bottom line.

EAPs are basically programmes that employers are paying for and they are intended to look at the psycho-social side of health.

Dr. Fundile Nyathi, CEO of Proactive Health Solutions

The benefits of having an EAP programme outweigh any other downside within an organisation. It makes a lot of business sense.

Dr. Fundile Nyathi, CEO of Proactive Health Solutions

Dr Nyathi shares his expert advice and callers shared their experiences with employers.

Listen to the entire discussion during the World of Work feature with Eusebius McKaiser:


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