The impact of human activity on the world’s wildlife

The World Wildlife Fund For Nature’s Living Planet releases a report this week describing a catastrophic decline in animal populations the world over.

The biannual report examined trends in the global the Living Planet Index, a biologist’s stock market index for the diversity and abundance of animals worldwide. It underscores the rapidly closing window for action and the urgent need for the global community to rethink and redefine how we value, protect and restore nature.

The LPI (Living Planet Index), which tracks trends in global wildlife abundance, indicates that global populations of fish, birds, mammals, amphibians and reptiles declined, on average, by 60% between 1970 and 2014, the most recent year with available data. The top threats to species identified in the report are directly linked to human activities, including habitat loss and degradation and over exploitation of wildlife.

This report is aimed at leaders of nations across the world because they need to sit down and come into a decision that will bind their nations to particular behaviours.

Morné du Plessis - Chief Executive of WWF South Africa

Over recent decades, human activity has severely impacted the habitats and natural resources we depend on, such as oceans, forests, coral reefs, wetlands and mangroves.

Morné du Plessis - Chief Executive of WWF South Africa

Click below for the full interview:


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