If you come to work high on dagga, you could get your company into big trouble

While the private use of dagga has been legalised, arriving to work under the influence of marijuana remains against the law.

Read: Capetonians get crash course on how to grow dagga at first cannabis workshop

Attorney and public law professor Halton Cheadle explains that the Occupational Health and Safety Act makes provision for conduct on the job.

The Act essentially says that every employer has a statutory obligation to ensure that people are not high or drunk at work, Cheadle shares.

Read also: Concourt ruling on cannabis needs to filter down to cops, says dagga couple

If an employer fails to comply with these laws, they are guilty of an offence that is liable on conviction to a fine of R50 000 or imprisonment for a year.

The difficulty with dagga, however, is determining or proving intoxication from the substance using a credible test method, Cheadle says.

Read more: Hits from the bong (it’s legal!)… then off to work I go?

There is no provision for authorisation of drugs [in the workplace], other than medicines.

Prof Halton Cheadle, public law professor and partner at BCHC Attorneys

If an accident does take place, then an employer would be liable.

Prof Halton Cheadle, public law professor and partner at BCHC Attorneys

The Act states that basically, every employer has to provide and maintain a safe and without-risk workplace.

Prof Halton Cheadle, public law professor and partner at BCHC Attorneys

In the regulations, it specifically says that an employer may not permit any person, who appears to be under the influence of intoxicating liquor or drugs, to enter or remain in the workplace.

Prof Halton Cheadle, public law professor and partner at BCHC Attorneys

It goes on further to say that no person shall be under the influence of, or have any possession or partake of intoxicating liquor or drugs in the workplace.

Prof Halton Cheadle, public law professor and partner at BCHC Attorneys

Listen to the intriguing discussion on The John Maytham Show:


This article first appeared on CapeTalk : If you come to work high on dagga, you could get your company into big trouble


Recommended

by NEWSROOM AI
Read More
Capetonians get crash course on how to grow dagga at first cannabis workshop

Capetonians get crash course on how to grow dagga at first cannabis workshop

Interest in learning how to grow cannabis is high after the ConCourt ruling that decriminalised the private cultivation of dagga.

Canada becomes the 1st large, rich nation to legalise recreational use of dagga

Canada becomes the 1st large, rich nation to legalise recreational use of dagga

The aim is to take profits away from criminals and to regulate a product that millions of Canadians consume illegally anyway.

Getting high, legally? Avoid paranoia; consider this about private use of dagga

Getting high, legally? Avoid paranoia; consider this about private use of dagga

The Money Show’s Bruce Whitfield interviews Anthony Norton, Managing Director at law firm Nortons Inc.

Dagga makes sex feel better for women (The Journal of Sexual Medicine)

Dagga makes sex feel better for women (The Journal of Sexual Medicine)

Dagga users have 20% more sex than non-users, says Stanford University researchers, and women find sex more fun when they’re high.

Elon Musk charged with fraud (wanted to impress girlfriend with dagga reference)

Elon Musk charged with fraud (wanted to impress girlfriend with dagga reference)

Musk allegedly wanted to impress his girlfriend, the rapper Grimes, with the $420 per share he claimed he had secured for Tesla.

Hits from the bong (it’s legal!)… then off to work I go?

Hits from the bong (it’s legal!)… then off to work I go?

The consequences of consuming dagga at home and showing up at the office high. Bruce Whitfield interviews a labour lawyer.

Popular articles
How to buy a new car even if you don’t really have enough money for it

How to buy a new car even if you don’t really have enough money for it

South Africans are increasingly buying cars they can’t afford using balloon payments, says consumer journalist Wendy Knowler.

'Government is going to hike personal income tax. There’s no doubt'

'Government is going to hike personal income tax. There’s no doubt'

SA’s personal income tax burden is among the world’s 10 heaviest. It’s about to get even worse, warns economist Mike Schüssler.

Hubby embarrassed after thinking staff wrote b**** on wife's take-away sarmie

Hubby embarrassed after thinking staff wrote b**** on wife's take-away sarmie

Khabazela shares tweets and Facebook posts that have gone viral.

Burger King rebrands as Bacon King (but drops 'ham' from the word 'hamburger')

Burger King rebrands as Bacon King (but drops 'ham' from the word 'hamburger')

"They seem to have succumbed to consumer pressure," says branding and advertising expert Andy Rice.

[WATCH] Reporter saying dead man 'was unavailable for comment,' goes viral

[WATCH] Reporter saying dead man 'was unavailable for comment,' goes viral

Khabazela shares tweets and Facebook posts that have gone viral.

10 unexpected things that most truly rich people have in common

10 unexpected things that most truly rich people have in common

Personal finance expert Warren Ingram on the money values that those "worth" R40 million or more almost invariably have in common.