[LISTEN] Don't think of going to work high on a joint...it can be tested

If you think the recent Con Court ruling on dagga use means you're free to go to work high, think again!

The Constitutional Court ruling on the legalisation of dagga has left employers confused on whether they're able to test staff for cannabis.

Azania Mosaka spoke to Labour Law Specialist Puke Maserumule and Howard Dembovsky from Justice Project SA about the laws relating to cannabis testing.

It's much more difficult to test for cannabis than it is to test for alcohol.

Puke Maserumule, Labour Law Specialist at Maserumule Incorporated

READ: Getting high, legally? Avoid paranoia; consider this about private use of dagga

ALSO READ: ConCourt rules dagga legal for private use, but what is private?

Testing for cannabis can be done via urine sample or via hair molecule sample. The only problem is that the presence of THC in a urine sample can be present for up to 6 weeks after a person has ingested it.

Howard Dembovsky, Justice Project SA

Listen to the full interviews below...


Recommended

by NEWSROOM AI
Read More
[LISTEN] The difference between polishing and waxing your car

[LISTEN] The difference between polishing and waxing your car

Exklusiv Autohaus owner Jignesh (Jiggy) Thakor shares his insights.

Why physical education in schools is as important as a child's academic work

Why physical education in schools is as important as a child's academic work

Azania spoke to Embury Institute for Higher Education physical education specialist lecturer Michael Mthethwa to discuss this.

If you come to work high on dagga, you could get your company into big trouble

If you come to work high on dagga, you could get your company into big trouble

The law essentially says that every employer has a statutory obligation to ensure that people are not high or drunk at work.

Capetonians get crash course on how to grow dagga at first cannabis workshop

Capetonians get crash course on how to grow dagga at first cannabis workshop

Interest in learning how to grow cannabis is high after the ConCourt ruling that decriminalised the private cultivation of dagga.

Fears over 'deadly' new drug being sold to learners

Fears over 'deadly' new drug being sold to learners

"Teachers have been complaining that it is hard to teach after lunchtime because the learners seem to be high on something."

Canada becomes the 1st large, rich nation to legalise recreational use of dagga

Canada becomes the 1st large, rich nation to legalise recreational use of dagga

The aim is to take profits away from criminals and to regulate a product that millions of Canadians consume illegally anyway.

Popular articles
Dis-Chem drives ad expert to 'Steve Hofmeyr-like assaults' on his decoder

Dis-Chem drives ad expert to 'Steve Hofmeyr-like assaults' on his decoder

"It’s been said you can’t bore people into buying your brand. Someone should’ve pointed this out to Dis-Chem," says Andy Rice.

Bone-dry Makhanda (Grahamstown) is falling apart

Bone-dry Makhanda (Grahamstown) is falling apart

What is going on in bone-dry Makhanda (Grahamstown)? Bruce Whitfield interviews Jacko Maree (St Andrew's College).

Brilliant graduate gets 50% scholarship to study in France. Can you help?

Brilliant graduate gets 50% scholarship to study in France. Can you help?

Paris-Sorbonne University accepted Khumo Mampuru into its master’s in quantitative economics course, but he’s €12 000 short.

'BEE has closed many avenues for skilled people'

'BEE has closed many avenues for skilled people'

Africa Melane speaks to EOSA's Johannes Wessels about why so many highly skilled South Africans are taking their talents overseas.

Zuma's legal strategy is poor, says Eusebius

Zuma's legal strategy is poor, says Eusebius

Eusebius McKaiser and callers discuss the former president's stay of prosecution application.

'Public Protector is protector of something, but not protector of the public'

'Public Protector is protector of something, but not protector of the public'

Scorpio investigative journalist Pauli van Wyk and independent legal consultant Phephelaphi Dube analyse the events.

Standard Bank takes on Capitec Bank with low-fee account, gigabytes of free data

Standard Bank takes on Capitec Bank with low-fee account, gigabytes of free data

The account costs R4.95 per month; you get 1GB of free data. Swipe 4 times a month; you get 0.5GB of free data and R50 airtime.

'You can easily get a 15% total return from a share like MultiChoice'

'You can easily get a 15% total return from a share like MultiChoice'

Is there an investment case for MultiChoice? Arabile Gumede interviews Jacques Plaut, a Portfolio Manager at Allan Gray.