How virtual reality speeds up helicopter design

On Technobyte this week we review the Fitbit Charge 3, how Virtual Reality is being used in designing future aircraft and Cisco predicts how much data we will be using in the next few years.

When it debuted at the HAI Heli-Expo in 2017, the media dubbed it “sleek” and “futuristic.” But for all its accolades, perhaps the most remarkable thing about the FCX-001 is that it was built in less than six months—a feat the company explains would never have been possible without the power of Virtual Reality (VR).

It normally takes 5-7 years to design a helicopter, requiring a complex process that involves software designs, physical mock-ups, pilot tests, focus groups and more, all before it even gets to creating an actual airframe for tests.

It’s a time-consuming, sometimes tedious, and extremely expensive process, in an industry where every delay could mean millions of dollars in lost revenue.

Bell CEO Mitch Snyder challenged his team to find a way to bring their products to market much faster. He created the Innovation Team to “explore ideas ahead of their time and advance design and experience to focus on emerging technologies.”

https://blog.vive.com/us/2018/09/26/bell-brings-revolutionary-fcx-001-market-10-times-faster-htc-vive/

The Fitbit Charge 3 is a massive jump from its predecessor featuring an extended battery life, a very fast processor and a new look thinner design.

You can now track over 15 different exercises including the ability to now track your swimming workouts. It also features a SpO2 sensor – a first for a Fitbit tracker – allows for the potential to estimate changes in blood oxygen levels and help track new health indicators, like sleep apnea.

https://www.fitbit.com/eu/charge3

The internet is made up of thousands of public and private networks around the world. And since it came to life in 1984, more than 4.7 zettabytes of IP traffic have flowed across it.

That’s the same as all the movies ever made crossing global IP networks in less than a minute. Yet the new Visual Networking Index (VNI) by Cisco predicts that is just the beginning. By 2022, more IP traffic will cross global networks than in all prior ‘internet years’ combined up to the end of 2016.

In other words, more traffic will be created in 2022 than in the 32 years since the internet started. Where will that traffic come from? All of us, our machines and the way we use the internet. By 2022, 60 percent of the global population will be internet users. More than 28 billion devices and connections will be online. And video will make up 82 percent of all IP traffic.

https://www.cisco.com/c/m/en_us/solutions/service-provider/vni-forecast-highlights.html


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