Future-proofing your child

The world has changed. The future has changed. Childhood is changing. Raising children has never been more challenging – or potentially rewarding.

It is increasingly obvious that the world into which our young children will enter as adults, somewhere between 2020 and 2030, will be nothing like the world their parents grew up in, or even the world we currently inhabit. We need a better understanding of the world of the future in order to prepare our children in a relevant way and to ‘future-proof’ them. Redi spoke to Creative Parenting expert and author of the best-selling book, Future-proof Your Child, Nikki Bush about how we can prepare our children for a world we don't understand.

What this uncertain future looks like:

At a recent Gordon Institute of Business Science (Gibs) forum, futurist Graeme Codrington, education specialist Michelle Lissoos and parenting expert Nikki Bush gave an overview of how the world of work is shifting. For instance:

By 2025 a quarter of the people in your office will be freelancers. This is the growth of the on-demand economy. The skills your business needs only when it needs them will be paid for only when it needs them.

Graeme Codrington, Futurist

How to prepare your child for the future:

Nikki speaks of some X-factors for success we must teach our children:

  • Creativity and the ability to be able to break convention
  • Learning - to keep up and learn new things all the time
  • Resilience - we must teach our children to adapt and to adopt change constantly
  • Teach children about themselves and understand who they are
  • Teach children to relate to others - and this begins at home. The family is the first team our children will play and work in

Nikki mentioned that parents are quick to gratify children's frustration - typically a parent would hand a child a device or toy when they get frustrated - and not letting the child(ren) deal with their emotions. About resilience, Nikki says:

It is okay for your child(ren) to get mad, they always get glad. They always come around. We're not allowing our child(ren) to feel their emotions and learn. That's how they learn about emotional intelligence and feeling the whole catastrophe of an emotional life.

In addition to this, we need to invest time for our children (even working parents who are pressed of time). Nikki says:

Learn to make time you have with your children count. It is possible to make future-proofing possible by learning to be fully present when you are with your child(ren). It is one thing to be present physically but another to be emotionally accessible.

Listen to the rest of the interview below:


Recommended

by NEWSROOM AI
Read More
What do you want done with your body when you die? Burial, cremation or science?

What do you want done with your body when you die? Burial, cremation or science?

Callers on the Eusebius Mckaiser Show discuss whether they want to be buried or cremated.

Signs your jealousy may be getting unhealthy

Signs your jealousy may be getting unhealthy

Managing jealousy has become increasingly important, particularly with the evolving structure of modern relationships says Dr Eve.

Naked Scientist: Why is it that women live longer than men?

Naked Scientist: Why is it that women live longer than men?

Naked Scientist Chris Smith says there is a range of reasons why this may be true.

'The revolution is imminent'

'The revolution is imminent'

Amcu President Joseph Mathunjwa's makes a bold statement and callers on the Eusebius McKaiser Show reflect on Marikana.

How parenting styles and behaviour affect your child

How parenting styles and behaviour affect your child

Research shows that parent behaviour has a significant impact on childhood development, parenting styles also play a role.

What the homeless can teach us about parenting

What the homeless can teach us about parenting

Overnight Live's Abongile Nzelezele finds out just how much there is to learn from homeless people...

Popular articles
Vigilante mob attacks alleged criminals in Daveyton

Vigilante mob attacks alleged criminals in Daveyton

Tensions are rife in the East Joburg township as the community attacked and killed criminals.

Survivor winner Tom Swartz vows to buy his wife 'new boobies and a family house'

Survivor winner Tom Swartz vows to buy his wife 'new boobies and a family house'

Swartz says he would have done anything to get the R1 million prize money.

'There is no way Magnus Malan could've done the things he is accused of'

'There is no way Magnus Malan could've done the things he is accused of'

Former police minister Adriaan Vlok has rejected accusations that former minister Malan was at the centre of a paedophile ring.

4 tips for safely investing right now when everything is so hectic

4 tips for safely investing right now when everything is so hectic

Bruce Whitfield asks Personal Financial Advisor Warren Ingram for advice on how investors can safely navigate this hectic time.

[Listen] Lottery responds to Tshepo's fraud claims

[Listen] Lottery responds to Tshepo's fraud claims

Philemon Letwaba says Tshepo's case relates to some of the issues that they are dealing with on a daily basis.

ANC Tshwane says the City's mayor knew of the looted R12 billion

ANC Tshwane says the City's mayor knew of the looted R12 billion

ANC Tshwane spokesperson Bafuze Yabo gives details of their planned action against the City of Tshwane.

Jacques Pauw: We need more evidence on the 'The Lost Boys of Bird Island' book

Jacques Pauw: We need more evidence on the 'The Lost Boys of Bird Island' book

Investigative journalist and author Jacques Pauw shares his thoughts on 'The Lost Boys of Bird Island' book.