Future-proofing your child

The world has changed. The future has changed. Childhood is changing. Raising children has never been more challenging – or potentially rewarding.

It is increasingly obvious that the world into which our young children will enter as adults, somewhere between 2020 and 2030, will be nothing like the world their parents grew up in, or even the world we currently inhabit. We need a better understanding of the world of the future in order to prepare our children in a relevant way and to ‘future-proof’ them. Redi spoke to Creative Parenting expert and author of the best-selling book, Future-proof Your Child, Nikki Bush about how we can prepare our children for a world we don't understand.

What this uncertain future looks like:

At a recent Gordon Institute of Business Science (Gibs) forum, futurist Graeme Codrington, education specialist Michelle Lissoos and parenting expert Nikki Bush gave an overview of how the world of work is shifting. For instance:

By 2025 a quarter of the people in your office will be freelancers. This is the growth of the on-demand economy. The skills your business needs only when it needs them will be paid for only when it needs them.

Graeme Codrington, Futurist

How to prepare your child for the future:

Nikki speaks of some X-factors for success we must teach our children:

  • Creativity and the ability to be able to break convention
  • Learning - to keep up and learn new things all the time
  • Resilience - we must teach our children to adapt and to adopt change constantly
  • Teach children about themselves and understand who they are
  • Teach children to relate to others - and this begins at home. The family is the first team our children will play and work in

Nikki mentioned that parents are quick to gratify children's frustration - typically a parent would hand a child a device or toy when they get frustrated - and not letting the child(ren) deal with their emotions. About resilience, Nikki says:

It is okay for your child(ren) to get mad, they always get glad. They always come around. We're not allowing our child(ren) to feel their emotions and learn. That's how they learn about emotional intelligence and feeling the whole catastrophe of an emotional life.

In addition to this, we need to invest time for our children (even working parents who are pressed of time). Nikki says:

Learn to make time you have with your children count. It is possible to make future-proofing possible by learning to be fully present when you are with your child(ren). It is one thing to be present physically but another to be emotionally accessible.

Listen to the rest of the interview below:


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