Young electorate concerned about corruption

It's election season and political parties are delivering their manifestos in a bid to sway the electorate into casting that all important vote in their direction.

One of the promises most parties are making is that they will deal with the unemployment affecting mostly the country's youth.

By the 29th of January, close to 580 000 more people under the age of 30 had registered to vote – bringing the total number of potential young voters to just over 2.6 million.

Shakira Maharaj who is a is Innovation Director at the DG Murray Trust conducted research to find out why many young people registered to vote.

A lot of young people were concerned about corruption, they wanted to see how that would be dealt with.

Shakira Maharaj, Innovation director - DG Murray Trust

There was a lot of concern around education and skills development and how the financing of youth enterprises would be facilitated in the short term.

Shakira Maharaj, Innovation director - DG Murray Trust

Maharaj says it is interesting how young people are connecting the elections to parliamentary representation.

They (youth) had a sense that the parliamentarians are quite aged. And they were wondering how connected they could be to their reality.

Shakira Maharaj, Innovation director - DG Murray Trust

Listen to the full interview below...


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