Legal dagga industry has become largest creator of jobs in the US - study

The legal dagga industry is the largest creator of jobs in the US, according to a study by Whitney Economics and Leafly.

The flourishing new sector has produced 211 000 permanent, full-time jobs in the states that have legalised dagga.

Legal dagga has added 64 000 full-time jobs in the past 12 months, according to the study.

The recreational use of dagga is legal in 11 states while 34 states have legalised it for medicinal purposes.

Researchers expect the dagga workforce to grow by 110% by 2020, making it the fastest growing job creator in the US.

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