Help keep Cape Town clean: CCID spends R11 million a year on waste removal

Cape Town Central City Improvement District’s (CCID) launches its annual #KeepItClean campaign, run by its Urban Management department.

CapeTalk's Kieno Kammies talks to CCID chief executive Tasso Evangelinos about the campaign.

Illegal dumping and littering is a worldwide phenomenon.

Tasso Evangelinos, Chief executive - CCID

But it is often regarded as a very dry subject so people tend to ignore these campaigns.

So we are trying to make it more interactive, more humorous, express a bit of anger and emotion where necessary so people participate and raise that awareness to a level where people take responsibility for their actions.

Tasso Evangelinos, Chief executive - CCID

CCID spends on average R11 million a year on waste removal in the city - and that's apart from the additional City of Cape Town spend.

That's a lot of money, especially during these tough economic times...every single ratepayer is going to be affected by this amount.

Tasso Evangelinos, Chief executive - CCID

For more information from CCID click here.

Take a listen to more from CCID's Evangelinos on the cleanup campaign:


This article first appeared on CapeTalk : Help keep Cape Town clean: CCID spends R11 million a year on waste removal


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