Today's Big Stories

Nobel recognises fight for children, Russia-SA nuclear deal lost?

Wins for South Asia activists in the fight for children's rights: the Nobel Peace Prize for 2014 has been jointly awarded to Pakistan’s Malala Yousafzai and India’s Kailash Satyarthi. It was announced by the Chair of the Norweigian Nobel Prize Committee, Thorbjørn Jagland. EWN India Correspondent, Venkat Narayan on Kailash Satyarthi:

He is instrumental in getting the government of India to ban child labour. He also got UNESCO to establish a global partnership for education. It’s an absolutely remarkable recognition made by the Nobel Committee of an Indian Hindu man and a Pakistani Muslim child. This is a great gesture that will reseal global recognitions in fighting the rights of children and child slavery.

Associated Press Pakistan Correspondent, Mohammed Fayaz on Malala Yousafzai:

The reaction has been mixed in Pakistan. Some have appreciated this, as they say it will help other children get an education. There is a group who are still at large that are against education, especially of girls. Overall, the government and women of Pakistan have appreciated this. 15 000 schools have been destroyed in some areas and the government has still been unable to repair some of these schools.

Was the SA-Russia nuclear deal lost in translation?: the Business Day says that Russian nuclear company Rosatom is now disowning its earlier statement that its signed a massive deal with our government to build and operate nuclear power stations here. Rosatom is now claiming that this was a badly translated document that caused all of this. Energy expert Chris Yelland says he doesn’t believe this claim:

The Russian media reported exactly what the South African media were reporting. If they can’t read English, it’s stated in plain English that the agreement also included wide-ranging technology considerations. It was a badly worded statement.

Will government salaries and social grants take over the public budget?: in the Financial Mail, new research suggests that within twelve years the entire government budget will be taken up with paying salaries and social grants. Chief Economist at Econometrix, Dr Azar Jammine:

It is very serious. In part, it’s an attempt to address job creation by government where it’s not happening in private sector while unions are demanding huge increases. If one looks at budgets from the past year, the intention is to slow down that trend dramatically.

Is a pregnancy grant viable for South Africa?: a new call from human rights group Amnesty International is that government should extend social grants to women who are pregnant. Director of the University of Johannesburg’s Centre for Social Development in Africa, Professor Leila Patel:

Yes, I think the proposal has merits due to the positive developmental benefits for nutrition with the mother and child that social grants present. What we must remember is not ‘the money’ but in fact what is the money buying. There are good proposals, good ideas out there, but let’s not look just at the financial benefit but what will be the return to society be.

Will democracy ever be realised in Hong Kong?: talks planned for today between pro-democracy protestors and the Beijing administration in Hong Kong have been called off. The talks were announced with great fanfare and were going to be live on television. EWN Hong Kong Correspondent Steve Vines:

Two days ago, I’d said it was the least worst of the worst options they’d (government) had – they must have changed their mind and realized in fact it is one of the ‘worst’ options. So within something like 24 hours’ notice, the government said the conditions the students had insisted upon to talk were unreasonable and therefore they wouldn’t take place.


Recommended

by THE NEWSROOM

702 welcomes all comments that are constructive, contribute to discussions in a meaningful manner and take stories forward.

However, we will NOT condone the following:

  • Racism (including offensive comments based on ethnicity and nationality)
  • Sexism
  • Homophobia
  • Religious intolerance
  • Cyber bullying
  • Hate speech
  • Derogatory language
  • Comments inciting violence.

We ask that your comments remain relevant to the articles they appear on and do not include general banter or conversation as this dilutes the effectiveness of the comments section.

We strive to make the 702 community a safe and welcoming space for all.

702 reserves the right to: 1) remove any comments that do not follow the above guidelines; and, 2) ban users who repeatedly infringe the rules.

Should you find any comments upsetting or offensive you can also flag them and we will assess it against our guidelines.

702 is constantly reviewing its comments policy in order to create an environment conducive to constructive conversations.

Read More
Veterans and ANC not on same page about terms of consultative conference

Veterans and ANC not on same page about terms of consultative conference

ANC vets want civil society groups present at the consultative conference, which they want held separately from another meeting.

Top SABC journos applauded for brave testimony

Top SABC journos applauded for brave testimony

EWN's Gaye Davis summarises the evidence of the SABC journalists who appeared before the ad hoc committee in Parliament.

If you're gona be a hero (and smash a car window), make sure you can prove harm

If you're gona be a hero (and smash a car window), make sure you can prove harm

A criminal lawyer explains what leg citizens can stand on if they witness a child or pet locked in a vehicle in risky conditions.

SABC 'in contempt of court' if Motsoeneng reports for duty, says DA

SABC 'in contempt of court' if Motsoeneng reports for duty, says DA

The DA's James Selfe says it is not clear whether SABC's Hlaudi Motsoeneng will be either fired or suspended pending an inquiry.

Tweeps throw shade as court shows Motsoeneng the door

Tweeps throw shade as court shows Motsoeneng the door

A judge has ruled that Hlaudi Motsoeneng should not hold any position at the SABC and Twitter has wasted no time reacting.

Why family traditions matter

Why family traditions matter

Whether it's breaking bread or celebrating through song and dance, family rituals and traditions can create a sense of belonging.

Popular articles
Meet the inspirational man who has lived with HIV since birth

Meet the inspirational man who has lived with HIV since birth

Ntimbwe Mpamba shares his life's journey of living with HIV. He is the longest living person with HIV in Africa.

Historical victory as Parliament passes paternity leave bill

Historical victory as Parliament passes paternity leave bill

The Labour Laws Amendment Bill seeks to regulate the right of parental leave for South African fathers and adoption leave.

Soon you may not be able to light up in public (indoors or out!)

Soon you may not be able to light up in public (indoors or out!)

The Dept of Health is looking to introduce draft legislation that includes a complete ban on all smoking in public areas.

'If you don't like dagga, you're not going to like the future', says lobbyist

'If you don't like dagga, you're not going to like the future', says lobbyist

The Clear Option's CEO, Quintin van Kerken, says the State has failed to make a convincing argument against legalising cannabis.

Dr Viwe Mtwesi is South Africa's youngest black female cardiologist

Dr Viwe Mtwesi is South Africa's youngest black female cardiologist

Dr Viwe Mtwesi spoke to Relebogile Mabotja about her achievements and commitment to serving people through her work.

Almost 30 million SA ID numbers compromised after site hacked

Almost 30 million SA ID numbers compromised after site hacked

Independent Marketing Consultant in the Technology Space, Andrew Fraser says this looks like a leak and not a hack.

'The university degree is dead'

'The university degree is dead'

Flux Trends founder Dion Chang gives five reasons why he believes getting a degree is past its sell by date.