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'The last man standing': Africa remembers liberation founding father 'KK'

18 June 2021 12:38 PM
Tags:
Kenneth Kaunda

Kenneth Kaunda, affectionately known as KK, became president of Zambia in 1964, when the southern African nation won its independence from Britain.

Liberation movements, politicians, academics and ordinary citizens across the African continent have paid tribute to late former Zambian President and liberation hero, Kenneth Kaunda.

Kaunda died at the age of 97 on Thursday in a hospital in Lusaka.

Kaunda, affectionately known as KK, became president of Zambia in 1964, when the southern African nation won its independence from Britain.

He continued in power until 1991 and was among the continent's few surviving liberation heroes.

Liberation leaders and parties, including Oliver Tambo, Zimbabwe’s Joshua Nkomo and Namibia’s Swapo, built their guerilla camps and trained their fighters in Zambia during his tenure.

State Security Minister Ayanda Dlodlo, who spent some time in Zambia in exile as a young freedom fighter, speaks to Clement Manyathela about what she will remember most about KK.

'My memories of the last man standing from the founding fathers from the Organisation of African Unity is that of solidarity, the love of freedom, the advancement of the cause for Pan-African ideals and, you know, he was an all-rounded internationalist who can lay claim to the fact that only one country is not liberated, that all of the countries were liberated in his time.

Ayanda Dlodlo, State Security Minister

Dlodlo says SADC countries like Tanzania and Zambia were an example and hope for countries like South Africa and Zimbabwe, which were not yet liberated a few decades, that attaining liberation was possible.

He leaves a very rich legacy. A colossal figure of African politics and liberation.

Ayanda Dlodlo, State Security Minister

African National Congress veteran Mavuso Msimang also painted a glowing image of KK on behalf of the party.

I'm so hurt and sad... what you can't exclude in your memory of Kaunda would be that he was a committed Pan-Africanist. He was extremely committed to the liberation of Southern Africa... Zambia bore the brunt of keeping people [foreign freedom fighters] there and being attacked for its sins."

Mavuso Msimang, African National Congress veteran

Clement is also joined by Sishuwa Sishuwa, a historian and lecturer at the University of Zambia to discuss how Zambians are remembering him.

We remember him in three or four main ways. The first is, we remember him as the founding father of the country, having led Zambia to independence in 1964. They see him as someone who, not just benefitted from the leadership of other people, he himself was incorporated into nationalist movements in 1953 by the leader of the African National Congress of Zambia... so, they remember him as that father figure but also one who developed leadership...

Sishuwa Sishuwa, historian and lecturer at the University of Zambia

Listen to the full interview below...




18 June 2021 12:38 PM
Tags:
Kenneth Kaunda

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