Why the world’s favourite drink (and drug!) is about to get WAY more expensive

Humanity consumes over 2.25-billion cups of coffee each day. The culture of coffee drinking is etched into our lives; from our morning fix to coffee dates with friends.

Latin America makes up the bulk of coffee exports and production (Africa comes in second) and has recently been threatened by fungi attacking its crops. Industry research has confirmed that climate change will definitely lead to an increase in the cost of your premium cup.

Waking up will soon cost more

“We will soon pay an extra R15 to R20 for a bag of coffee,” warns connoisseur and founder of Truth Coffee David Donde.

This come as no surprise considering the changing environment and other economic factors tied to the way we produce and consume the beverage.

The history of mass production of coffee goes as far back as the early 1900s and has been through three significant cultural phases or periods of change; the most recent being in the 1990s.

Coffee beans were once a European monopoly. Increased exportation and a cultural flurry lead to a more privatised affair and the rise of global corporations like Zoka and Starbucks.

Second most traded commodity

Coffee is the world’s second most traded commodity, after crude oil.

Local industry players like Truth Coffee and Woolworths are now in the business of sourcing their blend of quality coffees from particular farms instead of countries. “Specialty coffees offer better quality at a cheaper rate,” says Donde, “which is why Starbucks does not have a local South African franchise and is failing in parts of Australia.”

Also listen to the Soundcloud clip for more detail and to learn about the enormous labour costs involved in producing a cup of coffee.


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by THE NEWSROOM

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