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#BeautifulNews

#BeautifulNews

4 November 2019 10:03 PM

Guests :
Omphile Mabitsela
Can paper animals solve unemployment? Omphile Mabitsela believes so. After seeing
people living on the street, the seven-year-old resolved to start his own business, create
jobs, and combat poverty. Not when he’s older. Now. Mabitsela is set on his goal, and is
already building a stationery empire from the ground up.
The budding mogul trades in handmade bookmarks, which he calls quirk quirks. Using
an array of craft materials, Mabitsela fashions the bookmarks from origami animals
ranging from birds to pigs, as well as emojis and television characters. He sells them for
R10 each, along with other stationery through his company Quirk Quirk Inc.
So far, Mabitsela has sold over a thousand quirk quirks, and even recruited two friends
to help with the growing demand.
Mabitsela plans to expand his initiative in the future, designing an assortment of
products and partnering with courier companies. Committed to his dream, the
precocious entrepreneur shows what it means to pursue a venture for the greater good.
It takes creativity to tackle South Africa’s problems. And this boy means business.
Namgamso Xaso
Music is a divine element. For something that can’t be touched or seen, it can have a
powerful impact. When 14-year-old Namgamso Xaso ignited her talent as a
saxophonist, she began sharing her gift in an unusual way.
Venturing to animal shelters, Xaso plays smooth melodies while homeless dogs sway in
tune.Many rescues in shelters don’t find forever homes immediately. Music holds the
ability to transcend despair in any form and bring comfort to them.
As a member of the Kronendal Music Academy, Xaso also plays for an orchestra and
jazz band. When she’s not practising or performing, she delivers her magic to other
sentient beings. It’s not always about what you have to give, but how you use your gifts
to light up a life.
Macy-Rose Heuff
At the age of eight, this violinist is certain music will take her far. Heuff’s growing talent
is already charming audiences. With the instrument in hand, she has the courage to
pursue her dreams.
Heuff knew she wanted to play the string instrument the moment she saw a
performance on America’s Got Talent. Five years old at the time, she begged for lessons.
Despite her initial reluctance, Heuff’s mother gave in. And it’s paid off. Since then, Heuff
has proven her flair for music, having won gold at eisteddfods and performed in
national concerts.
Though Heuff practises with unfailing discipline, she still wishes she had more time to
play her heart out. Heuff hopes to make it onto global stages one day. In the meantime,
she offers impromptu performances during breaks at her school, The Wykeham
Collegiate. As Heuff shares her musical knowledge, other pupils sing along to her tunes.
Bow to string, she’s creating a crescendo of happiness.
Krish Lewis
Did you know there are large, unexplained swarms of jellyfish along South Africa’s
coastlines? Most beachgoers know little about these sea creatures other than their
ability to sting. Their misunderstood nature makes it difficult to appreciate and protect
them. The rich diversity of jellies swimming around remain largely unacknowledged
and unstudied. Krish Lewis, known as the “jelly guy”, is on a mission to discover more.
The marine biologist works at the Two Oceans Aquarium, where the jellyfish exhibit is
his focus. Lewis cares for a range of species, including the rare pink meanie jellyfish,
named for its colouring and love for eating other jellyfish. But his favourite is the
Benguela compass jelly, which is endemic to South Africa. Since 1997, scientists have
been trying to grow the species through all life stages in labs. Lewis became the first to
close the life cycle – a huge feat in cnidology.
Since 2012, he has been growing jellyfish from polyps – a stalk that develops from
fertilised eggs, then attaches to coastal reefs and pops off baby jellies. Lewis notes that
the most rewarding part of his job is watching them change physically. South Africa is
home to 20 species of ‘true’ jellyfish, which make up 10% of the global total. Many of
these remain misclassified.
By studying these life forms, we can ensure a balanced ecosystem. The bubble-like
organisms support a large diversity of underwater fauna and flora, which we’re
extremely lucky to have. Dedicated aquarists such as Lewis are revealing their value
and uncovering the mysteries of jellyfish.
Brittany Smith
When Brittany Smith learnt she was having twins, her excitement soon turned to worry.
Having been teased in school, Smith struggled with poor body image and low selfesteem
her whole life. But when she reached the third trimester of her pregnancy, her
mindset shifted. She gave birth to healthy girls and is now encouraging mothers to
embrace themselves as they are.
Pregnancy and childbirth are no small feats. To honour the strength it takes, Smith
teamed up with Durban-based photographer Michigan Behn to create a series of
intimate images. Women are captured showing off their bodies, complete with loose
skin and stretch marks. While magazines and social media place pressure on women to
lose weight straight after giving birth, these photos transcend the shame surrounding
postpartum bodies and champion authenticity. As she celebrates individuality, she’s
paying tribute to the wonder of motherhood.
The series has empowered Smith and freed her of the burden to appear an unrealistic
way. She hopes these photos will also show her daughters, who are now a year old, the
meaning of self-love when they’re older.Omphile Mabitsela
Can paper animals solve unemployment? Omphile Mabitsela believes so. After seeing
people living on the street, the seven-year-old resolved to start his own business, create
jobs, and combat poverty. Not when he’s older. Now. Mabitsela is set on his goal, and is
already building a stationery empire from the ground up.
The budding mogul trades in handmade bookmarks, which he calls quirk quirks. Using
an array of craft materials, Mabitsela fashions the bookmarks from origami animals
ranging from birds to pigs, as well as emojis and television characters. He sells them for
R10 each, along with other stationery through his company Quirk Quirk Inc.
So far, Mabitsela has sold over a thousand quirk quirks, and even recruited two friends
to help with the growing demand.
Mabitsela plans to expand his initiative in the future, designing an assortment of
products and partnering with courier companies. Committed to his dream, the
precocious entrepreneur shows what it means to pursue a venture for the greater good.
It takes creativity to tackle South Africa’s problems. And this boy means business.
Namgamso Xaso
Music is a divine element. For something that can’t be touched or seen, it can have a
powerful impact. When 14-year-old Namgamso Xaso ignited her talent as a
saxophonist, she began sharing her gift in an unusual way.
Venturing to animal shelters, Xaso plays smooth melodies while homeless dogs sway in
tune.Many rescues in shelters don’t find forever homes immediately. Music holds the
ability to transcend despair in any form and bring comfort to them.
As a member of the Kronendal Music Academy, Xaso also plays for an orchestra and
jazz band. When she’s not practising or performing, she delivers her magic to other
sentient beings. It’s not always about what you have to give, but how you use your gifts
to light up a life.
Macy-Rose Heuff
At the age of eight, this violinist is certain music will take her far. Heuff’s growing talent
is already charming audiences. With the instrument in hand, she has the courage to
pursue her dreams.
Heuff knew she wanted to play the string instrument the moment she saw a
performance on America’s Got Talent. Five years old at the time, she begged for lessons.
Despite her initial reluctance, Heuff’s mother gave in. And it’s paid off. Since then, Heuff
has proven her flair for music, having won gold at eisteddfods and performed in
national concerts.
Though Heuff practises with unfailing discipline, she still wishes she had more time to
play her heart out. Heuff hopes to make it onto global stages one day. In the meantime,
she offers impromptu performances during breaks at her school, The Wykeham
Collegiate. As Heuff shares her musical knowledge, other pupils sing along to her tunes.
Bow to string, she’s creating a crescendo of happiness.
Krish Lewis
Did you know there are large, unexplained swarms of jellyfish along South Africa’s
coastlines? Most beachgoers know little about these sea creatures other than their
ability to sting. Their misunderstood nature makes it difficult to appreciate and protect
them. The rich diversity of jellies swimming around remain largely unacknowledged
and unstudied. Krish Lewis, known as the “jelly guy”, is on a mission to discover more.
The marine biologist works at the Two Oceans Aquarium, where the jellyfish exhibit is
his focus. Lewis cares for a range of species, including the rare pink meanie jellyfish,
named for its colouring and love for eating other jellyfish. But his favourite is the
Benguela compass jelly, which is endemic to South Africa. Since 1997, scientists have
been trying to grow the species through all life stages in labs. Lewis became the first to
close the life cycle – a huge feat in cnidology.
Since 2012, he has been growing jellyfish from polyps – a stalk that develops from
fertilised eggs, then attaches to coastal reefs and pops off baby jellies. Lewis notes that
the most rewarding part of his job is watching them change physically. South Africa is
home to 20 species of ‘true’ jellyfish, which make up 10% of the global total. Many of
these remain misclassified.
By studying these life forms, we can ensure a balanced ecosystem. The bubble-like
organisms support a large diversity of underwater fauna and flora, which we’re
extremely lucky to have. Dedicated aquarists such as Lewis are revealing their value
and uncovering the mysteries of jellyfish.
Brittany Smith
When Brittany Smith learnt she was having twins, her excitement soon turned to worry.
Having been teased in school, Smith struggled with poor body image and low selfesteem
her whole life. But when she reached the third trimester of her pregnancy, her
mindset shifted. She gave birth to healthy girls and is now encouraging mothers to
embrace themselves as they are.
Pregnancy and childbirth are no small feats. To honour the strength it takes, Smith
teamed up with Durban-based photographer Michigan Behn to create a series of
intimate images. Women are captured showing off their bodies, complete with loose
skin and stretch marks. While magazines and social media place pressure on women to
lose weight straight after giving birth, these photos transcend the shame surrounding
postpartum bodies and champion authenticity. As she celebrates individuality, she’s
paying tribute to the wonder of motherhood.
The series has empowered Smith and freed her of the burden to appear an unrealistic
way. She hopes these photos will also show her daughters, who are now a year old, the
meaning of self-love when they’re older.


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