Presenter

Lovelyn Nwadeyi

Anyone who knows Lovelyn Nwadeyi knows to expect thought-provoking encounters with her. She graduated with a Masters in Peace and Conflict Studies and unique perspective to understanding South Africa, as a woman of Nigerian descent raised in Queenstown.

Learn more about Lovelyn...

Q: Presenting radio isn’t easy! What’s the best piece of advice you’ve ever received? A: It isn't at all! I am still very nervous before each show. The best piece of advice I received was to be myself and to remember to invite people to participate. Sometimes we forget our audience is very diverse so if you allow them to contribute to the show you end up filling up the slot with interesting content. People really appreciate being heard.

Q: What is your routine before the show/ how do you prep for your show? A: I try to be at the station at least 2 hours or 2hrs30min before the show. I still get very nervous and I am (un)fortunately a perfectionist so I like to read, research, check in with my producers and really familiarise myself with the guests and potential contributors for each show. Normally some liquid (tea, coffee, water) is involved in my prep. I also have music in my ears and most importantly some healthy laughter with the team before entering studio.

Q: Your favourite interview to date? A: This is a very unfair question. I have three interviews that totally cooked my brain for days, I can't choose a favourite.
Dr Lydia Cairncross, Dr Nthabiseng Legoete and Dr Asanda Benya - three amazing black women who juuuuuust rock my world! Best interviews so far!

Q: The dream interview you still wish for? And why? A: I would love to interview Thabo Mbeki - just because I think he is such a fascinating character and he has good taste in whisky! If I could, I would love to interview Simphiwe Dana as well - her music, her politics, her impact on young black people is just so profound.

Q: If you only had one phone call in an emergency situation, who would you call? A: I would call my brother. Chances are that if I am in an emergency situation I probably got myself in trouble and my brother would be best to cover for me and spin a pallatable story for my parents!

Q: If you could time travel, which era would you go back to? Why? or what would you do? A: Yhu?! Tough one! I would love to be in the earlier 9th or 10th century. This is a time when the Nri kingdom (known to be the earliest Igbo 'civilisation') was thought to have established its hegemony as under the Eri kingship. My Nigerian identity is important to me and unfortunately the history, traditions, religions, legacies of my people before colonialism is not well documented or well taught. I would have loved to be alive in that time to witness the development of the Igbo nation first hand.

Q: Share one of the items on your bucket list… A: I really want to visit Morocco - like on a serious note! I want to visit the first university in the world the University of al-Qarawiyyin established in 859 by Fatima Muhammad Al-Fihri Al-Quraysh in Fes, Morocco and today still has the world's oldest library. We keep being told that Europe has the first and the best and the greatest everything, but the first university and the oldest university in the world is right here in Africa and was set up by a WOMAN. As part of my Morocco trip, I also want to visit and go skiing in the Atlas Mountains...not that I have ever skied before.

Q; What REALLY irritates you? A: Bad planning/organisation and lies!

Q: What would you consider as your soulfood? A: I really love KFC - which doesn't count as soulfood but fried chicken really makes me happy.

Q: Are there any perks to being an on-air personality – quicker response to complaints? Better service? A: No, not really - I don't think I have crossed the threshold of famousness that facilitates such perks as yet. I wish it did though.

Q: What is your greatest weakness? A: I am really not the most patient person. I am patient when it comes to teaching people things, but I hate waiting for things to happen and standing in queues and waiting for life to happen.

Q: Your favourite possession right now? A: My books! I love my books!

Q: Your all-time favourite movie? A: Pride and Prejudice, the BBC version.

Q: When was the last time you were surprised (by something or someone)? A: The whole of 2016 nje was a perpetual surprise nje.

Q: Are you a big talker around the braai/dinner table or is talk something you save for the radio? A: I am a big talker if it isn't small talk.

Q: Twitter or Facebook or Instagram – which do you prefer? A: I really hate social media, but I know I am supposed to like it. So Twitter is better, it's snippets of info rather than overwhelming Facebook.

Q: Your favourite kind of gig beyond radio presenting? A: I love being at public lectures that cover different topics - you learn so much.

Q: You’ve just moved to Joburg, how has the transition been? A: So far so good! I love Johannesburg! The roads are slightly overwhelming so I still get lost if I try to drive without my GPS but I will get there.

Q: What’s on your Gauteng to do list - sights, attractions, restaurants etc.? A: To visit the Magaliesburg. And then to attend as many book festivals as I can get to!

In between what I get paid for and what I do pro-bono, I love to write, tell stories, read stories, enjoy good food and make music.

Lovelyn Nwadeyi
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