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'We can't afford to be tired of COVID-19 laws because the virus is not tired'

7 May 2021 1:39 PM
Tags:
#Covid19
Covid-10 vaccine
Prof Mosa Moshabela, Acting Deputy Vice-Chancellor of Research and Innovation - University of KwaZulu-Natal

Prof Mosa Moshabela says those controlling communication systems must encourage people to adhere to all the lockdown measures.

It looks like people have become too complacent and not adhering to COVID-19 lockdown regulations.

The World Health Organisation has warned of new infections in Africa due to delayed vaccine supplies and slow rollout.

The National Department of Health has also raised concerns over increases in infections in some districts in the country.

Prof Mosa Moshabela,| Acting Deputy Vice-Chancellor of Research and Innovation at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, has more.

A part of me is worried because I think people are tired. I feel in a way that people who control the communication systems forget that keeping people inspired to adhere to prevention measures is as much work as one needs to procure vaccines. You need fuel going to encourage people to stay adhered to all these measures.

Prof Mosa Moshabela, Acting Deputy Vice-Chancellor of Research and Innovation - University of KwaZulu-Natal

People are tired and it is understandable but we cannot afford to be tired because the virus is not tired and we have seen all these variants that are highly transmittable. We really have to make a lot of effort to make sure that people are on board.

Prof Mosa Moshabela, Acting Deputy Vice-Chancellor of Research and Innovation - University of KwaZulu-Natal

This is a responsibility we all have to take in all sectors of society, it's not just government. I would really like to see that whatever happens, we would have done our best.

Prof Mosa Moshabela, Acting Deputy Vice-Chancellor of Research and Innovation - University of KwaZulu-Natal

Can we see what is taking place in India happening here?

We have seen a little bit of that if you recall what happened in the Eastern Cape. Fortunately, for some reason so far South Africans have been able to comply with the restrictions. I suppose even the restrictions that we have put in place in the past, especially the second wave, helped curb problems that related to very aggressive variants of the virus.

Prof Mosa Moshabela, Acting Deputy Vice-Chancellor of Research and Innovation - University of KwaZulu-Natal

India is encountering that but they don't necessarily have restrictions in place, they don't have strong measures that depend on members of society in place to curb the infections and it is large population. I don't think we will get to that point in South Africa, if I'm being honest.

Prof Mosa Moshabela, Acting Deputy Vice-Chancellor of Research and Innovation - University of KwaZulu-Natal

I do worry that complacency can lead to a situation where the variants of concern can go on a runaway infection like a runaway train if we are not careful. I think we have an opportunity to prevent that and we should use it as much as possible.

Prof Mosa Moshabela, Acting Deputy Vice-Chancellor of Research and Innovation - University of KwaZulu-Natal

Listen below for the full interview...




7 May 2021 1:39 PM
Tags:
#Covid19
Covid-10 vaccine
Prof Mosa Moshabela, Acting Deputy Vice-Chancellor of Research and Innovation - University of KwaZulu-Natal

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