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Pupil dropout rate increases to 500,000 due to Covid-19

20 July 2021 3:08 PM
Tags:
Department of Education
School dropouts

The pupil dropout rate in the country has tripled to about 500,000 more throughout the pandemic, the highest in 20 years.

According to data provided in the latest National Income Dynamics Study - Coronavirus Rapid Mobile Survey, school drop from pupils has tripled to about 500,000, the highest in 20 years.

Economist and lecturer at the University Of Stellenbosch, Dr Debra Sheperd explained that the research was to analyse among adults living with children from the ages of 7 to 17, how many of those adults have reported back that their school-going age child did not return in 2021.

We make this prediction that probably 500,000 additional learners outside of the basic education, through making comparisons with the ‘general household survey’ which was collated pre-Covid times.

Dr Debra Sheperd, Economist and lecturer - University Of Stellenbosch

With Covid-19 the attendance rate over the past 18 months fluctuated to a low of 39% on overage in July last year and this was when certain grades were allowed to go back to school. By May this year, it was 92%.

Nompumelelo Mohohlowane, Deputy director in the research coordination, monitoring and Evaluation Directorate - DBE

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Deputy Director in the research coordination, monitoring and evaluation directorate at the National Department of Basic Education, Nompumelelo Mohohlowane, says the reason behind pupils dropping out is motivated by rotational attends in schools, children coming from low-income households not receiving daily meals in school and parents fear that their children may contract the virus.

Our understanding of what could be causing the absence in pupils in schools to range from anxiety amongst parents that their kids will contract the virus, socioeconomic status which has changed in some households and the anxiety from some learners who feel they may not be able to perform well in school because of the rotational attendance.

Nompumelelo Mohohlowane, Deputy director in the research coordination, monitoring and Evaluation Directorate - DBE

The thing that is coming through strongly is children not having food security and contracting Covid-19.

Dr Debra Sheperd, Economist and lecturer - University Of Stellenbosch

Listen to the full interview...




20 July 2021 3:08 PM
Tags:
Department of Education
School dropouts

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